Government Commitments to Truth and Reconciliation: Government Commitments

BC


May 11, 2022


22nd anniversary of the Nisga’a Final Agreement: Canada’s First Modern Treaty

Crown–Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, British Columbia Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Nisg̱a’a Lisims Government

NationTalk: The governments of Canada, British Columbia and the Nisg̱a’a Nation are commemorating the 22nd anniversary of the signing of British Columbia’s first modern Treaty, the Nisg̱a’a Final Agreement.

The anniversary is being commemorated this week at the Special Assembly of the Nisg̱a’a Nation, whose theme is “Through the Generations – With Resilience and Vision – Working Today for a Prosperous Tomorrow.” This is the Nations’ first in-person gathering since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

A landmark in the relationship between Canada and Indigenous Peoples, the Nisg̱a’a Agreement came into effect on May 11, 2000, marking the end of a 113-year journey — and the first steps in a new direction. Treaty relationships between partners are a critically important pathway to meaningful reconciliation. They help to support strong, healthy, thriving communities that benefit people today and for generations to come. An outstanding example of modern Treaty relationships, the Nisg̱a’a Final Agreement is studied internationally as a model of hope, trust and government-to-government cooperation.

The Final Agreement put control over land and resources back in the hands of Nisg̱a’a Nation, recognizing Nisg̱a’a Lands (2,000 square kilometres) and provides constitutionally-protected Treaty rights, including Treaty rights to hunt and fish in the Nass Wildlife Area and Nass Area.

Over the past few decades, the Nisg̱a’a have made progress in building their government and institutions, as well as facilitating economic development, including the sustainable development of natural resources and efforts such as the proposed Ksi Lisims LNG Natural Gas Liquefaction and Marine Terminal Project.

Through investments in tourism, the Nisg̱a’a Nation continues to attract Canadian and international audiences to the natural beauty of Nisg̱a’a Lands, creating jobs and economic opportunities not only in Nisg̱a’a communities but also in the broader Nass Valley. These projects have generated employment, business opportunities and revenue.

Quick Facts:

  • The Nisg̱a’a Final Agreement is the first modern-day Treaty in British Columbia and is the fourteenth modern Treaty in Canada to be negotiated since 1976.
  • It was also the first Treaty in Canada to provide constitutional certainty in respect to Indigenous Peoples’ Section 35 right to self-government.
  • The Treaty identifies the land and resources that form part of the agreement between Canada, British Columbia and the Nisg̱a’a Nation, as well as management authority.
  • The Treaty provides for an open, democratic and accountable Nisg̱a’a Government. It includes representation for all Nisg̱a’a through the Nisg̱a’a Lisims Government, four Village Governments, and three Urban Locals, which provide a voice for Nisg̱a’a citizens who live outside the Nass Valley.
  • The Nisg̱a’a Nation includes more than 7,600 people residing in the Nisg̱a’a Villages of Gingolx, Laxgalts’ap, Gitwinksihlkw, and Gitlax̱t’aamiks (formerly New Aiyansh) on British Columbia’s Northwest Coast, as well as in Terrace, Prince Rupert/Port Edward, and throughout the Lower Mainland.

April 21, 2022


Directive on Litigation upholds Indigenous Rights

Directives on Civil Litigation involving Indigenous Peoples

Ministry of BC Attorney-General: To better protect the rights of Indigenous Peoples and as a step toward implementation of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act (Declaration Act), the Province, in collaboration with Indigenous Peoples, has developed a new approach to litigation.

Regional Chief Terry Teegee, B.C. Assembly of First Nations, said: “The litigation directives are a step in implementing measures to meet the objectives of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in B.C. The government of British Columbia has fought Indigenous Peoples all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada on many occasions, seeking to deny our rights, and has lost.

Core objectives of the directives are to prioritize and promote resolution, innovation and negotiated settlement, and to reduce the potential for litigation.

“The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples requires Crown governments to create new approaches to resolving disputes, and a default to adversarial court fights is no longer appropriate,” said Chief Lydia Hwitsum of the First Nations Summit Political Executive. “The attorney general has made a positive step in creating the litigation directives. We welcome this and believe other changes will follow, including:

  • more focus on specialized and appropriate dispute-resolution processes
  • timely resolution of issues, and
  • other legal steps to ensure that upholding First Nations self-determination, title and rights is a core aspect of the laws of British Columbia. 

In issuing the litigation directives, the attorney general is demonstrating needed leadership to system change in British Columbia, which will contribute to improved Indigenous-Crown relations and our shared agenda for change.”

“British Columbia has taken a serious and historic step to end adversarial denials of the rights of Indigenous Peoples in courts, tribunals and all civil proceedings involving Indigenous Peoples,” said Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond (Aki-Kwe), professor of law, Peter Allard School of Law, University of British Columbia. “The litigation directives released today will bring necessary shifts in the mindset and approach of lawyers acting on behalf of the attorney general of British Columbia. We know in the past, endless procedural and technical motions and a blanket denial of rights poisoned relationships. The Province’s commitment to shift from previous adversarial and denial of rights approaches will bring greater opportunity for mediation, negotiation and settlement of matters. Now educators and leaders in the profession must ensure that lawyers receive further training and skills in resolution of these disputes, especially involving Indigenous legal approaches that are beneficial and part of the solution.”

David Eby, Attorney General, said: “We’re working to build a better future than our past by advancing true and lasting reconciliation throughout all aspects of government. It is important to preserve and respect the right of First Nations to advance rights and title through the court system when they choose to do so, while simultaneously recognizing that litigation is designed as an inherently adversarial process that can drive us further apart rather than advance reconciliation. My hope for these directives is that they will support government lawyers in minimizing the adversarial divisions of court processes while upholding the rights of Indigenous Peoples and promoting equitable resolutions outside of the court system.”

The directives are a part of the Province’s work to implement the Declaration Act, which provides the framework for the Province to, in consultation with Indigenous Peoples, take all measures necessary to align provincial laws and undertake an action plan to meet the objectives of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UN Declaration).

Click on the following ink to see full details on the 20 Directives:

https://news.gov.bc.ca/files/CivilLitigationDirectives.pdf


March 11, 2022


First Nations

A new reconciliation agreement between the Sts’ailes and British Columbia

STS’AILES XA’XA TEMEXW – A new reconciliation agreement between the Sts’ailes and British Columbia will support Sts’ailes’ social, cultural, economic and environmental goals, and increase prosperity for people in the lower Fraser Valley.

Sts’ailes Chief Ralph Leon shared in the Halq’emeylem language, “Ey swayel mekw’wat. Ey swayel tl’ó wáyél. Letstemot iyém te tset tl’ó wáyél. Ch’íthométsel mekw’wat te ey te syó:ys. Good day everyone. Today is a good day. Today we are strong and united. And I would like to thank everyone for the good work.”

The agreement outlines an incremental, step-by-step approach to implementation. In addition to the transfer of a 167-hectare parcel of Crown land along the Chehalis River, the agreement will support reconciliation with the Sts’ailes by providing $4.35 million over five years to support Sts’ailes in self-governance, restorative justice, economic initiatives and improved natural resource decision-making.

“Sts’ailes and the Province have a long history of partnership and I congratulate the entire Sts’ailes community for taking this next step in our journey together,” said Murray Rankin, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation. “This new agreement strengthens our relationship, supports Sts’ailes’ goals and vision for their territory and strengthens their participation in the regional economy.”

The reconciliation agreement includes supporting the Sts’ailes with:

  • exploring and establishing new economic opportunities in tourism and recreation;
  • building a Sts’ailes Guardian environmental stewardship program;
  • promoting land stewardship through a plant inventory and studies to support future land-use planning; and
  • developing social initiatives such as restorative justice.

In addition to this agreement, the Ministry of Health is providing $2.5 million to Sts’ailes to purchase land for a Sts’ailes-led primary health-care centre.


February 25, 2022


First Nations

Apology

BC Government expressed its deep regret for the mistakes of past governments in their treatment of Aboriginal people.


November 17, 2021


First Nations

Bill 18 “Indigenous Identity” and Bill 29 “Interpretation Act Amendments”

BC Government – Tabled Bill 18, which adds Indigenous identity as a protected ground against discrimination in the B.C. Human Rights Code. He also tabled Bill 29, which amends the Interpretation Act to make it clear that all provincial laws uphold, and do not diminish, the rights of Indigenous people protected under section 35 of the Canadian Constitution. This is known as a universal non-derogation clause.

The amendments to the Interpretation Act, developed in consultation and co-operation with Indigenous representative organizations, also add an interpretive direction that all provincial acts and regulations must be read so as to be consistent with the UN Declaration.

The provincial government’s obligation under the Declaration Act to align laws with the UN Declaration in consultation and co-operation with Indigenous Peoples was at the forefront as Bills 18 and 29 were developed. The purpose of the Interpretation Act is to provide guidance and assistance for the interpretation of laws where their meaning is not clear. The act applies to every piece of legislation unless the legislation notes otherwise.
https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2021AG0073-002191


July 20, 2021


First Nations

Revisions to “Draft” Action Plan to Implement UNDRIP

McCarthy Tetrault – The “draft” action Plan released in June 202 “identifies 79 proposed actions that the provincial government will take to achieve the objectives of UNDRIP in cooperation with Indigenous peoples over the next five years. The Province is currently seeking input on the plan and the deadline for submissions is July 31, 2021. Some of the measures include:

  • new framework for resource revenue sharing and other fiscal mechanisms to support Indigenous peoples;
  • the negotiation of joint-decision making agreements and agreements in which consent from Indigenous governing bodies will be required before the BC government exercises a statutory decision-making power;
    enhanced treaty implementation infrastructure and education of public servants about treaty rights and obligations;
  • reviews of various policies and programs relating to the stewardship of the environment, land and resources;
  • establishing targets for Indigenous representation in the public sector and combatting racism and systemic discrimination in key areas including policing and health care;
  • supporting the revitalization of Indigenous languages and the protection of Indigenous cultural sites;
  • establishing economic metrics to help evaluate progress as reconciliation is advanced; and
  • establishing a dedicated secretariat to coordinate the Province’s reconciliation and UNDRIP compliance efforts and a new institution to provide support to First Nations in their work of nation and governance rebuilding and resolution of overlapping claims.

There are a number of measures within the Draft Action Plan that will impact resource and infrastructure development in BC, including the negotiation of joint-decision making agreements and agreements requiring consent from Indigenous governing bodies. These agreements are expressly contemplated in the Declaration Act but go beyond requirements under the duty to consult and accommodate.

The Draft Action Plan is informed by a number of principles, including being premised on:

  • a distinctions-based approach (reflecting the distinctiveness of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis and their respective rights and interests);
  • legal plurality (recognizing the multitude of legal orders including Indigenous laws);
  • enabling (supporting government-to-government relationships between Indigenous peoples and the province); and
  • impactful (making tangible improvements to Indigenous peoples’ social, physical, cultural, and economic wellbeing).

The Draft Action Plan details 79 actions to be undertaken, which are divided into four themes:

  • Self-determination and inherent right of self-government;
  • Title and rights of Indigenous peoples;
  • Ending Indigenous-specific racism and discrimination; and
  • Social, cultural, and economic wellbeing.

https://www.mccarthy.ca/en/insights/blogs/canadian-era-perspectives/bc-proposes-extensive-changes-draft-action-plan-implement-undrip


April 23, 2021


First Nations

Budget 2021

Budget 2021 invests the following towards “MEANINGFUL RECONCILIATION building on the Fall 2020 Stronger BC Economic Recovery Plan to advance reconciliation and build a more inclusive economy. It includes funding for work with Indigenous peoples to advance reconciliation, and ensure Indigenous peoples can fully participate in B.C.’s economic recovery. Budget 2021 adds $60 million in annual base funding to the Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation. This is dedicated funding to support Indigenous participation in land and resource activities, including negotiations, and engagement on legislation, policy and programs.
Budget 2021 also includes:

  • $45 million to support culturally safe health services and more Indigenous liaisons in each regional health authority to improve health access and services for Indigenous peoples (In response to systemic racism in health services documented in “In Plain Sight”
  • $14 million for the First Nations Health Authority to deliver targeted mental health and addictions services to Indigenous peoples throughout B.C.
  • 400 more spaces in the Aboriginal Head Start program that provides culturally-relevant child care for Indigenous families
  • Funding to partner with hundreds of Indigenous communities and organizations to expand access to skills training programs

https://www.bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2021/pdf/2021_Highlights.pdf

The BC Assembly of First Nations has flagged the following oversights in the budget:

  • Lack of funding towards UNDRIP and the Action Plan to align BC laws with UNDRIP
  • Lack of funding geared towards the implementation of the MMIWG Action Plan and Calls for Justice;
  • overall advancement in the Indigenous justice sector;
  • cannabis strategy and legalization;
  • wild salmon conservation and aquaculture;
  • emergency management and reform of the Emergency Program Act (EPA); and
  • forestry reform, including old growth management.

April 16, 2021


First Nations

Wet’suwet’en title and rights.

The Province is providing Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs with $7.22 million to support work to implement Wet’suwet’en title and rights. The funding will be used to support Wet’suwet’en governance, engage in unity-building activities and facilitate ongoing discussions related to the 2020 Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The three-year funding commitment will support the Wet’suwet’en in their work on governance and the shared goal of reunification within Wet’suwet’en Nation. The Office of the Wet’suwet’en, Houses and Clans will undertake an internal engagement process to advance unity-building, which will be inclusive of all Wet’suwet’en House members.
The new provincial funding will also support more resources for Wet’suwet’en Nation to revitalize Wet’suwet’en governance structures for water stewardship, wildlife programs, eco-system monitoring and other initiatives to enhance collaborative stewardship and management of land and resources in the Yintah (Wet’suwet’en territory).
In support of meaningful reconciliation, the goal in reaching out to neighbouring communities, interested parties and stakeholders is to build understanding of the Wet’suwet’en distinct relations to the Yintah. This includes how implementation of Wet’suwet’en title and rights contributes to a vibrant economy and strong local relationships that will benefit the entire region. There is also ongoing work within the provincial government to support reconciliation and recognition of Wet’suwet’en title and rights.


February 5, 2021


Métis

AGM Vote on Self-Government

NationTalk – The highlight of the Annual General Meeting February 18-20, will be a historic vote on self-government. The highlights of the AGM will be the discussion and voting on nine resolutions focusing on issues such as Métis youth, citizenship, children in care, self-governance, Regional Governance Councils, community funding, by-elections including:

Resolution 6: Self-Governance Declaration

A resolution to declare, among other things, that Métis Nation BC, the MNBC Constitution and legislative acts, and MNBC governing bodies and agencies are the recognized government and legislation of the self-governing British Columbia Métis community.
https://nationtalk.ca/story/dr-bonnie-henry-highlights-historic-metis-nation-bc-agm-feb-18-20


June 30, 2020


First Nations

2019/20 UNDRIP Report Card

Release of the 2019/2020 UNDRIP Report Card outlines progress made towards implementation for the time period from the date on which the Declaration Act was brought into force (November 28, 2019) until end of fiscal year 2019/20 (March 31, 2020). Progress to date includes the following:

  • Revitalizing Indigenous Languages
  • Improving Justice for Indigenous People
  • Improving the Approach to Child Welfare
  • Sharing Long-Term Stable Revenues
  • Working Together to Address Housing Needs
  • Improving Emergency Preparedness
  • Improving Educational Outcome for Indigenous Students
  • Supporting Skills Training Opportunities for Indigenous Learners
  • Recognizing Unique and Distinct Paths to Self-Determination
  • Changing How the Public Service Works with Indigenous Peoples: A Government-to-Government Approach

The process and introduction of the legislation represents a fundamental cultural and legal shift within the government, public service and the province. It leaves a lasting impact, creating precedents for legal progress and new ways of working in cooperation and consultation with Indigenous peoples as a means to advance reconciliation.

The Action Plan will be released before the end of 2020.
https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/british-columbians-our-governments/indigenous-people/aboriginal-peoples-documents/dripa_annual_report_2020.pdf


January 17, 2020


Métis

Métis Nations of Ontario, Alberta and Saskatchewan Tri-Council Meetings

The Métis Governments of Alberta, Ontario and Saskatchewan held a historic Tri-council meeting this week in Edmonton, Alberta from Jan. 14-16, 2020. This meeting marks the first time that their elected representatives have assembled together since signing Métis Government Recognition and Self-Government Agreements (MGRSA) with Canada in June 2019. The primary focus was on identifying common priorities, mutual beneficial opportunities and enhancing collaboration and cooperation between the three Métis Governments. The Tri-council delegates passed a resolution:

  • calling for more transparency and accountability from the Métis National Council (MNC);
  • affirming that self-government and rights related discussions and negotiations must occur between Canada and the Métis Governments, not through the MNC; and
  • directing the creation of a working group to explore potential reform of the MNC.

They also passed a joint declaration:

  • to continue to work together at the national level in their ongoing collaborations and negotiations with Canada.
  • to develop a memorandum of understanding that formalizes the relationship of the Métis Governments at the national level for consideration at a future Métis Government Tri-council meeting

January 5, 2020


First Nations

BC Human Rights Tribunal Report

BC Human Rights tribunal releases “Expanding Our Vision: Cultural Equality & Indigenous Peoples”, a report addressing serious access to justice concerns for Indigenous peoples bringing human rights complaints to the tribunal. makes nine recommendations. Removing barriers to access to the Human Rights Tribunal is not enough. Structural change is needed to incorporate Indigenous definitions of human rights according to Indigenous laws. The main recommendations broaden the concept of human rights, including adding Indigenous Identity to the BC Human Rights Code and incorporating Indigenous legal traditions and international human rights principles as reflected in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which BC has recently committed to implementing through legislation.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1AN6YQPXUJ9Zbf9NnyHjQt1OD0mvZG50I/view


November 5, 2019


First Nations

Annual BC Cabinet Ministers & First Nations Leadership Council

BCAFN – In just one year, the Province and the First Nations Leadership Council (FNLC) have worked together to deliver on promises to share provincial gaming revenues and introduce legislation that enshrines the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UN Declaration) in provincial law. The Declaration will make BC the first province to implement these internationally recognized human rights into provincial law, creating a framework for reconciliation between the provincial government and Indigenous peoples in B.C.

More than $70 million in new revenue has made it into First Nations communities since a gaming revenue-sharing agreement was signed in August 2019 to support self-government and self-determination for First Nations, as well as strong healthy communities and services that make life better for families. In just two months, almost 170 First Nations have joined the newly formed B.C. First Nations Gaming Revenue Sharing Limited Partnership.

Nearly $200 million in provincial gaming revenue was transferred to the limited partnership in August 2019, representing the first two years of funding. In October 2019, amendments to the Gaming Control Act were passed. These amendments will pave the way for a long-term agreement that will see more than $3 billion shared with First Nations over 25 years.


October 24, 2019


First Nations

Intro Bill 41 “The Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act”

Premier John Horgan’s government introduced Bill 41 – ”The Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act” to have the laws of BC reflect the United Nations The declaration’s 46 articles are aimed at making sure Indigenous peoples can survive with dignity and are treated fairly and with equity after colonization. (Toronto Star)

The Declaration became law on Nov. 28, 2019 when it was unanimously passed by the BC Legislature. Over time as laws are modified or built, they will be aligned with the UN Declaration. Additional elements of the bill include:

  • a requirement to develop an action plan to meet the objectives of the UN Declaration, in collaboration with Indigenous peoples;
  • annual public reporting to monitor progress;
  • discretion for new decision-making agreements between the Province and Indigenous governments where decisions directly affect Indigenous peoples and mechanisms exist in applicable legislation – with clear processes, administrative fairness and transparency; and
  • recognition for additional forms of Indigenous governments in agreement-making, such as multiple Nations working together as a collective, or hereditary governments – as determined and recognized by the citizens of the Nation.

March 22, 2019


Métis

Métis Nation BC and Island Health LOU on Health Services

Métis Nation British Columbia (MNBC) President Clara Morin Dal Col, and Island Health Chair Ms. Leah Hollins, signed a Letter of Understanding (LOU). The LOU outlines a framework in which the Parties will work together to increase MNBC’s influence in decision making related to health services that impact Métis individuals, families and communities within the Island Health region. The LOU will improve access to health services, health outcomes and provide opportunities to bring lasting change in the delivery of health and care to Metis people.”


February 18, 2019


First Nations

Lottery Revenue Sharing

British Columbia Lottery Corporation revenue is going to be shared with the First Nations and the first phase of allocations amounts to 7% of gross revenues.


February 13, 2019


First Nations

2019 Speech from the Throne

BC Assembly of First Nations (BCAFN) Regional Chief Terry Teegee welcomes the NDP government’s progressive actions identified throughout the 2019 Throne Speech today, including:

  • develop legislation with the First Nations Leadership Council to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples;
  • gaming revenues shared with First Nations communities;
  • work in collaboration with Indigenous peoples to develop new clean economy opportunities and help communities adapt to the impacts of climate change. This will include collaboration on a climate change adaptation strategy to be developed for 2020;
  • additions to education curriculums in history and languages;
  • commitment to restoring and sustaining wild salmon stocks;
  • promotion of partnerships between First Nations and private sector resource development projects.

January 10, 2019


First Nations

Wet’suwet’en conflict

UBCIC – Premier John Horgan compared the Province’s role in the ongoing conflict in Wet’suwet’en territory with the recent consent-based negotiations in the Broughton Archipelago with the ‘Namgis, Kwikwasutinuxw Haxwa’mis and Mamalilikulla First Nations. The big difference is that the latter “included jointly developed consent-based process where our Title and Rights were recognized and as a result, we included our hereditary leadership in decision-making on outcomes. That’s an extremely important distinction because for us, that’s how we respected Delgamuukw and the wishes of our people”. Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, President of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs.

“As the Supreme Court of Canada recognized in Delgamuukw, inherent Wet’suwet’en Title to their territory has never been extinguished. The Proper Title holders must provide their free, prior and informed consent to any project in their territory.” Kukpi7 Judy Wilson, Secretary-Treasurer of the UBCIC


December 1, 2018


First Nations

The Principals’ Accord on Transforming Treaty Negotiations

Government of Canada, the Government of British Columbia and the First Nations Summit (the Principals) -signed the “Principals’ Accord” that states that extinguishment and surrender of rights have no place in modern-day Crown-Indigenous relations or agreements. Instead, the federal and provincial governments and First Nations Summit have agreed that Aboriginal title and rights must be continued through treaties, as well as other types of agreements.

  • The Accord states that the Principals respect the right of each First Nation to select its own pathway to exercising self-determination and whether it pursues reconciliation with the provincial and federal governments through treaties or other types of agreements and arrangements.
  • The Accord affirms that treaty negotiations and implementation must reflect the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 94 Calls to Action.
  • The Accord demonstrates the Principals’ commitment to transformative change beyond the recommendations set out in the 2016 Multilateral Engagement Process to Improve and Expedite Treaty Negotiations in British Columbia.

https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/environment/natural-resource-stewardship/consulting-with-first-nations/agreements/principals_accord_signed_dec_1_2018.pdf


November 29, 2018


First Nations

First Nations gaming distribution limited partnership

B.C. First Nations will share in provincial gaming revenue to support self-government, strong, healthy communities, and services that make life better for families. This funding will be a central piece of Budget 2019 to support reconciliation. Funding will focus on priorities in the following framework: health and wellness; infrastructure, safety, transportation and housing; economic and business development; education, language, culture and training; community development and environmental protection; and capacity building, fiscal management and governance. Within that framework, First Nations governments will determine their own priorities for these funds.


November 29, 2018


First Nations

UNDRIP

The BC Assembly of First Nations, First Nations Summit and Union of BC Indian Chiefs, working together as the First Nations Leadership Council (FNLC), and the Province announced they are co-developing new legislation for introduction in 2019 to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in B.C. The Commitment recognizes our inherent rights of self-determination and jurisdiction, as well as our rights related to our lands, resources and territories.


July 25, 2018


Métis

MOU on Reconciliation

The Government of Canada and the Métis Nation British Columbia signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on reconciliation. Co-developed by partners, the MOU represents a joint commitment to identify challenges, opportunities and priorities. This MOU reflects the work going on across the Métis Nation with Governing Members on a path to self-determination. “Under this Memorandum, for the first time ever, we are going to begin discussions on at least 17 different subject areas, including Métis Section 35 Rights under the Constitution Act, 1982.” President Clara Morin Dal Col Métis Nation British Columbia.


May 23, 2018


First Nations

Draft Principles that Guide the Province of British Columbia’s Relationship with Indigenous Peoples

Release of “Draft principles” that recognizes that:

  • all relations with Indigenous peoples need to be based on the recognition and implementation of their right to self- determination, including the inherent right of self-government.
    that reconciliation is a fundamental purpose of section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982.
    the honour of the Crown guides the conduct of the Crown in all of its dealings with Indigenous peoples.
  • Indigenous self-government is part of Canada’s evolving system of cooperative federalism and distinct orders of government treaties, agreements, and other constructive arrangements between
  • Indigenous peoples and the Crown have been and are intended to be acts of reconciliation based on mutual recognition and respect.
  • meaningful engagement with Indigenous peoples aims to secure their free, prior and informed consent when B.C. proposes to take actions which impact them and their rights, including their lands, territories and resources.
  • respecting and implementing rights is essential and that any infringement of section 35 rights must by law meet a high threshold of justification which includes Indigenous perspectives and satisfies the Crown’s fiduciary obligations.
  • reconciliation and self-government require a renewed fiscal relationship, developed in collaboration with the federal government and Indigenous nations that promotes a mutually supportive climate for economic partnership and resource development.
  • reconciliation is an ongoing process that occurs in the context of evolving Crown-Indigenous relationships.
  • a distinctions-based approach is needed to ensure that the unique rights, interests and circumstances of Indigenous peoples in B.C. are acknowledged, affirmed, and implemented.

https://news.gov.bc.ca/files/6118_Reconciliation_Ten_Principles_Final_Draft.pdf?platform=hootsuitehttps://news.gov.bc.ca/files/6118_Reconciliation_Ten_Principles_Final_Draft.pdf?platform=hootsuite


May 23, 2018


Métis

Draft Principles that Guide the Province of British Columbia’s Relationship with Indigenous Peoples

Release of “Draft principles” that recognizes that:

  1. all relations with Indigenous peoples need to be based on the recognition and implementation of their right to self- determination, including the inherent right of self-government. 
  2. that reconciliation is a fundamental purpose of section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982. 
  3. the honour of the Crown guides the conduct of the Crown in all of its dealings with Indigenous peoples. 
  4. Indigenous self-government is part of Canada’s evolving system of cooperative federalism and distinct orders of government treaties, agreements, and other constructive arrangements between
  5. Indigenous peoples and the Crown have been and are intended to be acts of reconciliation based on mutual recognition and respect. 
  6. meaningful engagement with Indigenous peoples aims to secure their free, prior and informed consent when B.C. proposes to take actions which impact them and their rights, including their lands, territories and resources. 
  7. respecting and implementing rights is essential and that any infringement of section 35 rights must by law meet a high threshold of justification which includes Indigenous perspectives and satisfies the Crown’s fiduciary obligations. 
  8. reconciliation and self-government require a renewed fiscal relationship, developed in collaboration with the federal government and Indigenous nations that promotes a mutually supportive climate for economic partnership and resource development. 
  9. reconciliation is an ongoing process that occurs in the context of evolving Crown-Indigenous relationships. 
  10. a distinctions-based approach is needed to ensure that the unique rights, interests and circumstances of Indigenous peoples  in B.C. are acknowledged, affirmed, and implemented. 

https://news.gov.bc.ca/files/6118_Reconciliation_Ten_Principles_Final_Draft.pdf?platform=hootsuitehttps://news.gov.bc.ca/files/6118_Reconciliation_Ten_Principles_Final_Draft.pdf?platform=hootsuite


February 13, 2018


First Nations

2018 Speech from the Throne

In the Speech from the Throne, the NDP government pledged to develop a cross-ministry framework to meet its stated commitment to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, the calls to action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Tsilhqot’in decision. The Union of BC Indian Chiefs sited recent approval of Site C Dam as a flagrant example of the abrogation of Treaty 8 rights.


July 25, 2017


First Nations

Mandate Letters

New NDP premier re-affirmed his party’s commitment to adopt the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the calls to action of Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission and has each of his 22 ministers to review policies, programs and legislation to determine how to bring the principles of the declaration into action in British Columbia


July 25, 2017


Métis

NDP commitment letters to his ministers

New NDP premier re-affirmed his party’s commitment to adopt the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the calls to action of Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission and has each of his 22 ministers to review policies, programs and legislation to determine how to bring the principles of the declaration into action in British Columbia


November 16, 2016


Métis

Renewal of 2006 Accord

Renewal of accord first signed in 2006 to strengthen relationships between the provincial government and Métis people with objectives to address health, housing, education, economic opportunities, Métis identification and data collection as well as any opportunities for engaging in a tripartite relationship with the federal government. In addition to recommitting to the original objectives of the accord, the updated version covers an additional four areas: children and families, information sharing, justice and wildlife stewardship.


June 16, 2015


First Nations

Response to TRC Summary Report

Nothing specific. Indicated ongoing, current initiatives in Education, Health, Child Welfare, Domestic Violence, Health, Language & Culture, Justice,


June 16, 2015


Métis

Response to TRC Summary Report

Nothing specific. Indicated ongoing, current initiatives in Education, Health, Child Welfare, Domestic Violence, Health, Language & Culture, Justice,