Government Commitments to Truth and Reconciliation: Government Commitments

Fed. Govt.


June 28, 2022


Inuit

Inuit – Crown Partnership Committee meeting

Crown–Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada – The Government of Canada and Inuit leaders have been working closely together through the Inuit-Crown Partnership Committee (ICPC) to advance reconciliation, strengthen the Inuit-Crown partnership, and create a more prosperous Inuit Nunangat through meaningful collaboration.

On Monday, June 27, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Marc Miller and Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami President Natan Obed met with other members of the ICPC, in Inuvik, in the Inuvialuit region of Inuit Nunangat to discuss shared priorities, including:

  • Inuit land claims,
  • legislative priorities, and
  • the implementation of the Inuit Nunangat Policy, which was formally endorsed and funded by the Government of Canada and Inuit leadership in April 2022.

The Policy will guide how federal departments work with Inuit partners on the design, development and delivery of new and renewed policies, programs, services and initiatives that apply in Inuit Nunangat or benefit Inuit. The Government has pledged $25.4 million over five years to accelerate implementation of the policy. Inuit and the federal government are currently working through the establishment of a governance framework and associated Secretariat to support these efforts.

During Monday’s meeting, officials also endorsed work plans on two of ICPC’s new priority areas:

  • Sovereignty, Defence and Security
  • Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning

The Government of Canada will continue to work with Inuit leadership through the ICPC to build a renewed Inuit-Crown relationship and advance reconciliation based on affirmation of rights, respect, and partnership.

Quick facts

  • The Inuit-Crown Partnership Committee was founded on the principle that an equal partnership between Inuit and the Crown is essential to the reconciliation process. The Committee meets three times a year. Once a year it is co-chaired by the Prime Minister and the President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami.
  • The Committee also includes, as permanent participants, the presidents of Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada, the National Inuit Youth Council, and Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada.
  • Inuit Nunangat is the Inuit homeland in Canada. It encompasses the land, water, and ice of the Inuit land claim regions of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region of the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Nunavik in Northern Quebec, and Nunatsiavut in Northern Labrador.

Associated links


May 11, 2022


22nd anniversary of the Nisga’a Final Agreement: Canada’s First Modern Treaty

Crown–Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, British Columbia Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Nisg̱a’a Lisims Government

NationTalk: The governments of Canada, British Columbia and the Nisg̱a’a Nation are commemorating the 22nd anniversary of the signing of British Columbia’s first modern Treaty, the Nisg̱a’a Final Agreement.

The anniversary is being commemorated this week at the Special Assembly of the Nisg̱a’a Nation, whose theme is “Through the Generations – With Resilience and Vision – Working Today for a Prosperous Tomorrow.” This is the Nations’ first in-person gathering since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

A landmark in the relationship between Canada and Indigenous Peoples, the Nisg̱a’a Agreement came into effect on May 11, 2000, marking the end of a 113-year journey — and the first steps in a new direction. Treaty relationships between partners are a critically important pathway to meaningful reconciliation. They help to support strong, healthy, thriving communities that benefit people today and for generations to come. An outstanding example of modern Treaty relationships, the Nisg̱a’a Final Agreement is studied internationally as a model of hope, trust and government-to-government cooperation.

The Final Agreement put control over land and resources back in the hands of Nisg̱a’a Nation, recognizing Nisg̱a’a Lands (2,000 square kilometres) and provides constitutionally-protected Treaty rights, including Treaty rights to hunt and fish in the Nass Wildlife Area and Nass Area.

Over the past few decades, the Nisg̱a’a have made progress in building their government and institutions, as well as facilitating economic development, including the sustainable development of natural resources and efforts such as the proposed Ksi Lisims LNG Natural Gas Liquefaction and Marine Terminal Project.

Through investments in tourism, the Nisg̱a’a Nation continues to attract Canadian and international audiences to the natural beauty of Nisg̱a’a Lands, creating jobs and economic opportunities not only in Nisg̱a’a communities but also in the broader Nass Valley. These projects have generated employment, business opportunities and revenue.

Quick Facts:

  • The Nisg̱a’a Final Agreement is the first modern-day Treaty in British Columbia and is the fourteenth modern Treaty in Canada to be negotiated since 1976.
  • It was also the first Treaty in Canada to provide constitutional certainty in respect to Indigenous Peoples’ Section 35 right to self-government.
  • The Treaty identifies the land and resources that form part of the agreement between Canada, British Columbia and the Nisg̱a’a Nation, as well as management authority.
  • The Treaty provides for an open, democratic and accountable Nisg̱a’a Government. It includes representation for all Nisg̱a’a through the Nisg̱a’a Lisims Government, four Village Governments, and three Urban Locals, which provide a voice for Nisg̱a’a citizens who live outside the Nass Valley.
  • The Nisg̱a’a Nation includes more than 7,600 people residing in the Nisg̱a’a Villages of Gingolx, Laxgalts’ap, Gitwinksihlkw, and Gitlax̱t’aamiks (formerly New Aiyansh) on British Columbia’s Northwest Coast, as well as in Terrace, Prince Rupert/Port Edward, and throughout the Lower Mainland.

April 25, 2022


Hudson’s Bay Company transfers former flagship store to Southern Chiefs’ Organization

A Winnipeg landmark Rich in Symbolism Comes Under Indigenous Control

New York Times: The bay announced that it was giving the property and the building to Southern Chiefs Organization, which represents 34 Manitoba First Nations. Having secured about 100 million Canadian dollars in funding, the majority from the federal government, the Southern Chiefs have ambitious plans for the site: affordable housing, assisted living, a healing centre, a day care, a museum, meeting spaces and restaurants, among other amenities.

Above all, the Bay’s decision to hand over its former headquarters to a First Nations group in the city with Canada’s largest urban Indigenous population is deeply symbolic. The Bay, more than any other organization, was a driving force behind the European colonization of Canada. The company was founded in 1670 to exploit the fur trade in Rupert’s Land, an area that makes up about a third of present-day Canada. King Charles II, without consulting the Indigenous population, claimed the territory as England’s and gave it to his cousin. The company’s relationship with Indigenous people from that point on was one largely of exploitation.

“It’s quite proper that First Nations are being given this land back,” Grand Chief Jerry Daniels of the Southern Chiefs’ Organization told me. “I think it shows that corporate Canada has an interest in taking an active role in sort of rebuilding its relationship with Indigenous people.”

Chief Daniels told me that negotiations for the acquisition of the building went back at least 18 months. Early on, Chief Daniels said, he traveled to New York with, among others, Phil Fontaine, the former national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, to meet with Richard A. Baker, the real estate magnate who owns the department store chain. He said that in addition to agreeing to give the building to the group, Mr. Baker promised to work with the chiefs on its revival.

The plan for the renovation is in advanced stages, Chief Daniels said, though negotiations are still underway for additional funding of about 30 million Canadian dollars.

The often ill-defined concept of “land back” has become the focus of a lot of Indigenous people in recent years. Many Indigenous people define it as when governments return land — or crown land, as it is commonly called — to the First Nations and other Indigenous groups. Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, the acting head of the department of Indigenous studies at the University of Manitoba, said that the Bay project would not truly qualify as land back unless the federal government formally recognized the store as an urban reserve, or sovereign Indigenous territory.

But he nevertheless praised the project, known as Wehwehneh Bahgahkinahgohn, which he has not been involved in. “It’s a fantastic initiative,” he said. “People should be very proud.”

Professor Sinclair said that the project would benefit more than just Indigenous people, arguing that it would also be a boon to Winnipeg and its struggling downtown.

“Indigenous peoples will be reoccupying a space that is of important historical value to us,” he told me, “but they will also be cleaning up a mess that a big company left behind.”


April 21, 2022


Inuit

Inuit Nunangat Policy

Today, the Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, and President Natan Obed of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, alongside federal Cabinet ministers and the elected Inuit leadership from the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation, Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, Makivik Corporation, and the Nunatsiavut Government, endorsed the new, historic Inuit Nunangat Policy at a meeting of the ICPC. This marks the first time the Government of Canada has co-developed an overarching, whole-of-government policy of this nature.

The Inuit Nunangat Policy recognizes Inuit Nunangat – the Inuit homeland – as a distinct geographic, cultural, and political region, encompassing:

  • Inuvialuit Settlement Region: Northwest Territories
  • Nunavut
  • Nunavik: Northern Québec
  • Nunatsiavut: Northern Labrador

The policy is inclusive of urban areas where Inuit reside. It will help guide the design, development, and delivery of all new or renewed federal policies, programs, services, and initiatives that apply in Inuit Nunangat or benefit Inuit.

With the goal of promoting prosperity and supporting community and individual well-being throughout Inuit Nunangat, the Government of Canada is committing a total of $25 million over five years for the implementation of the Inuit Nunangat Policy. This includes $20 million for projects to accelerate policy implementation in line with Inuit priorities. The Government of Canada and Inuit will continue to work together to implement the policy through a strategic, coordinated, and whole-of-government approach.

During the meeting, the Prime Minister, President Obed, and Committee members also discussed proposed Budget 2022 investments and linkages to ICPC priority areas, in particular a new investment of $845 million over seven years in housing support across Inuit Nunangat. Inuit leadership and ministers also endorsed several new priority areas of work, including international Inuit priorities, monitoring, evaluation, and learning as well as sovereignty, defence, and security.

Today’s endorsement of the Inuit Nunangat Policy is an important step toward supporting Inuit self-determination and ensuring meaningful, Inuit-led solutions to the distinct issues faced by Inuit. The Government of Canada will continue to work with Inuit leadership through the ICPC to build a renewed Inuit-Crown relationship and advance reconciliation based on affirmation of rights, respect, and partnership.

https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1650556354784/1650556491509


April 7, 2022


Budget 2022 invests $11B in Indigenous reconciliation initiatives

Budget 2022 proposes to invest $11 billion over six years to continue to support Indigenous children and families, and to help Indigenous communities continue to grow and shape the`ir futures through the following initiatives:

Child Welfare: ($4,297M)

  • $4.017B to support long-term reforms to improve implementation of Jordan’s principle
  • $280M over 5 years to support implementation of Indigenous child welfare laws

Residential Schools ($275M over 5 years)

  • $209.8M over 5 years to help communities to:
    • document, locate and memorialize burial sites at former residential schools
    • support the operations of and a new building for the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation
    • ensure complete disclosure of federal documents related to residential schools
  • $10.4M over 2 years to Justice Canada to support appointment of Special Interlocutor to strengthen deferral laws and practices to protect and preserve unmarked burial sites
  • $5.1M over 5 years to ensure RCMP can support community-led responses to unmarked burial sites
  • $25M over 3 years to Library and Archives Canada to support digitization of millions of documents related to the federal Indian Day School System to ensure survivors have meaningful access to them
  • $25M over 3 years to Parks Canada to support commemoration and memorialization of former residential school sites

Indigenous Health ($686.1M over 1 to 2 years)

  • $268M in 2022-23 to continue to provide high-quality healthcare in remote and isolated First Nations communities on-reserve
  • $190.5M in 2022-23 for Indigenous Community Support fund to mitigate ongoing impacts of COVID-19
  • $227.6M over 2 years to maintain trauma-informed, culturally-apprpriate, Indigenous-led services to improve mental wellness, and to support efforts initiated through Budget 2021 too co-develop distinctions-based mental health and wellness strategies

Education ($310.6M over 5 years)

  • $310.6M over 5 years to support better student outcomes through a Regional Education Agreement with the First Nations Education Council , which includes 22 member communities in Québec

Infrastructure

Clean Drinking Water ($571.2M over 2-10 years)

  • $398M over 2 years to Indigenous Services Canada to support community infrastructure on reserve, of which at least $247M will be directed toward water and wastewater infrastructure
  • $173.2M over 10 years to Indigenous Services Canada to support the transfer of water and wastewater services in 17 communities to the Atlantic First Nations Water Authority

Community Infrastructure ($162.6M over 3 years)

  • $162.6M over 3 years the enable the completion of required infrastructure with respect to the Lubicon Lake Band settlement agreement

Housing ($3,936M over 5-7 years))

  • $4B over 7 years to Indigenous Services Canada and Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada to accelerate work in closing Indigenous housing gaps as follows:
    • $2.4B over 5 years to support First Nations housing on reserves
    • $565M over 5 years to support housing in First Nations Self-Governing and Modern Treaty Holders communities
    • $845M over 6 years to support housing in Inuit communities
    • $190M over 7 years for housing in Métis communities
  • $300M over 5 years through the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to co-develop and launch an Urban Rural and Northern Indigenous Housing Strategy
  • $2B of the $20B provided for long-term reform of the First Nations Child and Family Service program to target the housing needs of First Nations children once a final settlement agreement is reached.

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act ($75M over 5 years)

  • $65.8 M over 5 years and $11M ongoing to Justice Canada and Natural Resources Canada to accelerate work to meet legislated requirements including the co-development of an action plan with Indigenous partners
  • $9.5M over 5 years to the Dept. of National Defence to align its operations and engagement with Indigenous peoples with the Act.

Indigenous Climate Leadership ($160.9M over 2-5 years)

  • $29.6M over 3 years to Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada to support the co-development on an Indigenous Climate Leadership Agenda to support self-determined action in addressing Indigenous peoples’ climate priorities. The funding will also support the phased implementation of distinctions-based climate strategies
  • $103.4M over 5 years to Natural Resources Canada to develop a National Benefit-Sharing Framework and the expansion of the Indigenous Partnership Office and the Indigenous Natural Resource Partnership program. At least $25M of this funding should be dedicated to early engagement and Indigenous communities’ capacity building to support their participation on the critical minerals strategy
  • $27.9M over 2 years to Natural Resources Canada for the Line 3 and the Trans Mountain Expansion Project pipelines’ Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committees, to enable Indigenous communities to identify common priorities and provide informed advise on thees projects

Supporting Indigenous Businesses and Community Economic Developments ($200M over 5 years)

  • $150M over 5 years to Indigenous Services Canada’s Lands and Economic Development Services Program and Community Opportunity Readiness Program to advance shovel ready economic opportunities in Indigenous communities
  • $15M over 5 years to the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency to support Indigenous economic development in the north
  • $35M over 5 years to Indigenous Service Canada to increase economic capacity supports, including specialized training opportunities delivered by Indigenous-led organizations

March 3, 2022


First Nations

Pursuing legislative solution to end impact of enfranchisement under the Indian Act

The Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Indigenous Services and Juristes Power Law, who represent the plaintiffs in the Nicholas v Canada (Attorney General), are pleased to announce that they have reached a mutual agreement to put the litigation on hold while working to pursue a legislative solution to end the ongoing impact of enfranchisement under the Act today.

Minister Hajdu has committed to work towards introducing legislation in the House of Commons by summer to make the necessary amendments to the registration provisions of the Indian Act.

“Enfranchisement” was a process whereby members of First Nations lost eligibility to registration and membership in their home communities. In return, they gained basic entitlements, such a:

  • Canadian citizenship
  • the right to vote in Canadian elections
  • the right to hold land in fee simple, and 
  • freedom from compulsory residential school attendance for their children.

While the enfranchisement process was removed from the Indian Act in 1985, the fact of historical enfranchisement continues to play a role in determining entitlement to registration today.


December 14, 2021


First Nations, Inuit, Métis

2021 Fall Economic Statement

Government of Canada: This fiscal update includes a provision to settle the cases on harm to First Nation children currently before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal and to invest in transforming the services offered to First Nation children and their families.

  • We have provisioned $20 billion for compensation and $20 billion to improve the system going forward.
  • $37M over 5 years for Indigenous Services Canada and the Treasury Board Secretariat to work to meet Canada’s target of 5 per cent of federal contracts being awarded to businesses managed and led by Indigenous peoples as announced on August 6, 2021. The funding will be used to modernize the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business, engage and consult with Indigenous partners and rights holders, and implement a reporting framework.
  • $33M funding over 2 years proposed for Indigenous Services Canada to support a coordination agreement with Cowessess First Nation to exercise jurisdiction over child and family services under “An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families”, as announced on July 6, 2021.
  • $320M ovr 5 years is proposed for the departments of Canadian Heritage, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Indigenous Services Canada to further address the tragic legacy of residential schools. Funding will allow more Indigenous communities to undertake the work to locate, document and commemorate the burials of children who died while attending residential schools, enhance residential schools commemoration activities, install a National Residential Schools Monument, increase access to trauma-informed health and cultural support services and support the demolition and rehabilitation of residential school sites, as announced on August 10, 2021.

https://budget.gc.ca/efu-meb/2021/report-rapport/EFU-MEB-2021-EN.pdf


December 10, 2021


First Nations, Inuit, Métis

Second Annual (2021) Statutory Report

Release of “Second Annual (2021) Statutory Report Pursuant to Section 10 of the Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Act, Statutes of Canada, Chapter 29, 2019”. The report covers the period between April 1, 2020 and March 31, 2021 and emphasizes that the government’s path to reconciliation is guided by the:

  • Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples
  • Qikiqtani Truth Commission
  • Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action
  • National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and girls Calls for Justice
  • Implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People
  • Arctic and Northern Policy Framework

Progress to Date:

  • MMIWG Action Plan released on June 3, 2021
  • Formalizing relationships with Indigenous women’s organizations: Native Women’s Association of Canada, Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada and Les Femmes Michif Otipemisiwak (Women of the Métis Nation)
  • Completion of 16 Calls to Action (vs 4 completed by Indigenous Watchdog’s count as of March 31, 2021. Now 20 vs 8 as of March 21, 2022)
  • Introduced legislation to address UNDRIP (C2A #43), Statutory Holiday (C2A #80), Oath of Citizenship (C2A #94)
  • Advancing Calls to Action #71-76 to address Missing Children and Burial Information
  • Commitment to settle “Indigenous childhood claims litigation”
  • From Jan. 1, 2016 to March 31, 2021, 173 claims have been resolved for $4.7B in compensation. As of March 31, 2021, there were 584 claims in the Specific Claims Inventory: 177 in assessment, 338 in negotiations and 69 under the purview of the Specific Claims Tribunal

For full details on a wide range of other topics see:
https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1638827347500/1638827371759


August 14, 2021


First Nations

Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund

Federal Government announced an investment of $4.3 billion over four years for the Indigenous Community Infrastructure Fund. Starting in 2021-22, this fund will support immediate demands, as prioritized by Indigenous partners.

This includes:

  • $2.709 billion to support First Nations on reserve
  • $517.7 million to support Self-Government and Modern Treaty Partners
  • $517.8 million to support Inuit communities
  • $240 million to support Métis communities
  • $18 million to support northern Indigenous communities
  • $194.9 million to support urban and off-reserve Indigenous communities and organizations

The Government of Canada recognizes that access to quality infrastructure, which includes water treatment facilities, sufficient transportation infrastructure, well-built homes, quality health facilities, schools, and other community infrastructure is vital to a community’s physical, mental, social and economic health and well-being.


July 6, 2021


First Nations

Appointment of Mary Simon as Governor-General of Canada

Appointment of Mary Simon as Canada’s 30th Governor General since Confederation. Mary Simon (Ningiukudluk) is an Inuk born in Kangisualuujjuaq, Nunavik (Quebec). She is an advocate for Inuit rights and culture in Canada. She has represented the Inuit to the Canadian government and the United Nations, including work that led to the Inuit people’s inclusion in the Constitution in 1982. Mary Simon’s has dedicated her life to working and advocating for Indigenous peoples. Her accomplishments and leadership make her an excellent role model, as she truly understands that restoring culture is central to restoring Indigenous communities.

Over four decades, she has held various senior leadership positions, including President of Makivik Corporation, where she helped to protect and promote Inuit rights through the implementation of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement. She also served two terms as President of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, now known as the Inuit Circumpolar Council, and as President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami.

As the first Canadian Ambassador for Circumpolar Affairs, Ms. Simon played a leading role in strengthening the ties between the people of the Arctic regions nationally and internationally, including through the creation of the Arctic Council. She is also the founder of the Arctic Children and Youth Foundation, and has served as the Ambassador of Canada to Denmark.


April 24, 2021


First Nations

National Dialogue on Indigenous Health

The Third National Dialogue on Indigenous Health – Federal Government announced specific funding allocations of $126.7 million over three years, first announced in Budget 2021, to support efforts to address racism in Canada’s health systems.

This includes:

  • $33.3 million to improve access to culturally safe services, with a focus on services for Indigenous women, 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, persons with disabilities and other marginalized groups who may experience intersecting discrimination. This includes expanding support for Indigenous midwifery and doula initiatives and strengthening funding for national Indigenous women’s organizations, as well as regional and grassroots organizations.
  • $46.9 million to support the changes to health systems through the integration of cultural and patient safety at all levels, as well as through increased Indigenous representation in health professions.
    This includes $14.9 million, which will be used by Health Canada to establish a program that will provide funding to Indigenous organizations and health partners to support projects that can implement distinctions-based solutions to address anti-Indigenous racism. This funding will also support much-needed capacity for Indigenous partners to undertake meaningful engagement on the development of policy and programs for health priorities.
  • $37.8 million to improve supports and accountability by providing distinctions-based funding to Indigenous organizations for new Indigenous patient advocates that will allow Indigenous patients to more safely navigate federal and provincial health systems.
  • $8.7 million to provide federal leadership, which includes convening national dialogues like this one today to advance concrete actions to address anti-Indigenous racism in Canada’s health systems, and leading by example by evaluating and improving Indigenous Services Canada’s programs and practices to ensure

April 19, 2021


First Nations

2021 Speech from the Throne

We will invest more than $18 billion to further narrow gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, support healthy, safe, and prosperous Indigenous communities, and advance reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis Nation. We will invest more than $6 billion for infrastructure in Indigenous communities, and $2.2 billion to help end the national tragedy of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls


October 30, 2020


First Nations

First Annual (2020) Statutory Report

Release of “First Annual (2020) Statutory Report Pursuant to Section 10 of the Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Act, Statutes of Canada, Chapter 29, 2019“.

The Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Act came into force on July 15, 2019 and established CIRNAC, while the Department of Indigenous Services Act established ISC. The former INAC – legally, the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development – was abolished by the Budget Implementation Act, 2019. CIRNAC was established to carry out activities that support the Government of Canada’s commitment to advancing reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples. Its primary focus is renewed nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown, and government-to-government relationships based on affirmation and implementation of rights, respect, cooperation, and partnership.

CIRNAC also works to promote respect for the rights of Indigenous Peoples recognized and affirmed by section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, and the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Such activities include:

  • facilitating collaboration and cooperation with Indigenous Peoples and with the provinces and territories in relation to entering into and implementing agreements;
  • the recognition and implementation treaties concluded between the Crown and Indigenous Peoples;
    promoting self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the residents and communities of the Canadian North, taking into account their respective needs and challenges;
  • recognizing and promoting Indigenous ways of knowing, being and doing; and,
  • promoting public awareness and understanding of the importance of working toward and contributing to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples.

The whole-of-government approach to reconciliation and supporting Indigenous self-determination is rooted in three pillars:

  • acknowledging and addressing the past;
  • closing socio-economic and service gaps; and
  • supporting visions for self-determination and renewed relationships.

As of March 31, 2020 the government claims to have completed 12 of the TRC Calls to Action.

For compete details on what the government has accomplished in the fiscal year April 1, 2019 through March 31, 2020, please see the following:
https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1603127273100/1603127325936 – chp19


October 16, 2020


First Nations

Emergency Meeting on Heath

After the death of Joyce Echaquan at a hospital in Québec, the Government of Canada convened an urgent meeting with provincial and territory health officials and National Indigenous organizations with the following objectives:

  • to listen to lived experiences of Indigenous people and health care professionals regarding systemic racism in federal, provincial and territorial health systems
  • to reflect upon the information shared to inform concrete measures that governments, educational institutions, health professional associations, regulatory colleges, and accreditation organizations can take
  • to commit to a second gathering in January 2021 where these proposed or implemented measures would be presented by governments and health care organizations

September 1, 2020


First Nations

Pandemic Commitments

Throughout the pandemic, the Government has made it a priority to support Indigenous communities, which has helped contain the spread of COVID-19 and kept people safe. That is something the Government will continue to do. The Government will walk the shared path of reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples, and remain focused on implementing the commitments made in 2019. However, the pandemic has shown that we need to keep moving forward even faster on a number of fronts including by:

  • Expediting work to co-develop distinctions-based Indigenous health legislation with First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis Nation, and a distinctions-based mental health and wellness strategy;
  • Accelerating work on the National Action Plan in response to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls’ Calls for Justice, as well as implementation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action;
  • And continuing to close the infrastructure gap in Indigenous communities, working on a distinctions-basis with First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis Nation to accelerate the government’s 10-year commitment.

The Government will also:

  • Make additional resiliency investments to meet the clean drinking water commitment in First Nations communities;
  • And support additional capacity-building for First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis Nation.
  • The Government will move forward to introduce legislation to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples before the end of this year.

March 9, 2020


Métis

Otipemisiwak, A Nat’l Conference on Métis Self-Government

The Métis Nation of Ontario (MNO), the Métis Nation – Saskatchewan (MN-S), and the Métis Nation of Alberta (MNA) are coming together to host the first ever National Conference dedicated to conversations about Metis Self-Government in Canada. This two-day gathering will discuss the next steps on advancing Métis rights and self-government.


January 14, 2020


Métis

Métis Governments of Alberta, Ontario, Saskatchewan Tri-Council Meetings

The Métis Governments of Alberta, Ontario and Saskatchewan – held a historic Tri-council meeting this week in Edmonton, Alberta from January 14 to 16, 2020. This meeting marks the first time their elected representatives have assembled together since signing Métis Government Recognition and Self-Government Agreements (MGRSA) with Canada in June 2019. the primary focus was on identifying common priorities, mutual beneficial opportunities and enhancing collaboration and cooperation between the three Métis Governments.

The Tri-council delegates passed a resolution:

  • calling for more transparency and accountability from the Métis National Council (MNC);
  • affirming that self-government and rights related discussions and negotiations must occur between Canada and the Métis Governments, not through the MNC; and
  • directing the creation of a working group to explore potential reform of the MNC.

The Tri-council delegates also passed a joint declaration to continue to work together at the national level in their ongoing collaborations and negotiations with Canada. As well, they will work to develop a memorandum of understanding that formalizes the relationship of the Métis Governments at the national level for consideration at a future Métis Government Tri-council meeting.

Increasingly the MNO, MNA, and MNS have been working together to advance common interests trilaterally and to develop shared and balanced solutions to advance reconciliation, self-governance, and community well-being


December 5, 2019


First Nations

2019 Speech from the Throne

AFN – “This is the first Throne Speech to include a section on ‘Reconciliation’:

  • take action to co-develop and introduce legislation to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the first year of the new mandate;
  • continue the work of eliminating all long-term drinking water advisories on reserve by 2021, and ensure safe drinking water in First Nations communities;
  • co-develop new legislation to ensure that Indigenous people have access to high-quality, culturally relevant health care and mental health services;
  • continue work to implement the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, and the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls’ Calls for Justice, in partnership with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples;
  • work with Indigenous communities to close the infrastructure gap by 2030;
  • continue to move forward together to ensure that Indigenous Peoples are in control of their own destiny and making decisions about their communities;
  • take new steps to ensure the Government is living up to the spirit and intent of treaties, agreements, and other constructive arrangements made with Indigenous Peoples;
  • ensure that Indigenous people who were harmed under the discriminatory child welfare system are compensated in a way that is both fair and timely; and
  • continue to invest in Indigenous priorities, in collaboration with Indigenous partners.

August 15, 2019


Inuit

Federal Government apology in response to Qikiqtani Truth Commission’s Final Report, Achieving Saimaqatigiingniq

Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations delivered an official apology on behalf of the Government of Canada to the Qikiqtani Inuit for the Government’s actions in the Qikiqtani region between 1950 and 1975. “During this period, Government policies included forced relocation and family separation of Qikiqtani Inuit, the killing of qimmiit (sled dogs), who were key to culture, survival and community health since time immemorial, and other assimilative actions. These actions have resulted in deep and lasting effects on Qikiqtani Inuit.”

To move forward, Minister Bennett announced that Canada and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association (QIA) have established a Memorandum of Understanding to work in partnership to build a long-term and sustainable response to the Qikiqtani Truth Commission’s findings. This includes identified funding to implement programming for Qikiqtani Inuit to promote Inuit culture, healing and well-being for current and future generations.
https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1565717416770/1565717444492


July 12, 2019


Métis

Métis National Heritage Centre

The Manitoba Metis Federation (MMF) and the Government of Canada unveiled new funding ($3.4M from Government of Canada) for the construction of a Métis National Heritage Centre in Winnipeg. The centre will be the first of its kind in Canada and will showcase the history of the Métis Nation, highlighting the rich heritage and contributions of the Métis People to the development of Canada. The Métis National Heritage Centre will provide Metis Citizens with an opportunity to tell their story. It will also provide Canadians with an opportunity to learn about the heritage, language, culture, methods of governance, and contributions of the Métis Nation before, during, and after Confederation.


June 27, 2019


Métis

Métis Government Recognition and Self-Government Agreements

These agreements affirm the Métis right of self-government and recognize the mandates of the Métis Nation of Alberta, the Métis Nation of Ontario and the Métis Nation-Saskatchewan. The agreements also set out next steps to formally recognize Métis governments as Indigenous governments in Canadian law.
While the Métis Nation of Alberta, the Métis Nation of Ontario and the Métis Nation-Saskatchewan already have well-established province-wide governance structures, the agreements signed today deal with the recognition of Métis jurisdiction in core governance areas (citizenship, leadership selection and government operations). They also set out processes for negotiating other agreements dealing with additional areas of jurisdiction in the future.
http://www.metisnation.org/media/655313/2019-06-27-mno-mgrsa-final-to-be-posted-on-website.pdf


June 10, 2019


Métis

Canada – Métis Post-Secondary Sub-Accord

The Sub-Accord fulfills commitments outlined in the 2017 Canada-Métis Nation Accord and is a historic step in closing the post-secondary education attainment gap between Métis citizens and non-Indigenous Canadians. This Sub-Accord will establish new approaches aimed at improving the education outcomes of Métis Nation students and programs and support three activity streams including student support, community-based programs and services, and governance capacity.


April 26, 2019


Inuit

Release of “Nation-Building at Home, Vigilance Beyond”

Nunatsiaq News – Release of “Nation-Building At Home, Vigilance Beyond: Preparing for the Coming Decades in the Arctic” with 15 of 28 recommendations relating to Indigenous peoples:

  • Meaningful partnerships with Indigenous peoples and northern communities (7)
  • Defence, Security and Stewardship (0)
  • Geopolitics (0)
  • Circumpolar diplomacy and Indigenous rights (6)
  • Climate Change, Science and Knowledge (2)

https://nunatsiaq.com/stories/article/arctic-sovereignty-means-northern-partnerships-canadian-mps-declare/


April 1, 2019


Inuit

Budget 2019 Inuit Investments

Proposed Inuit-specific investments total $395.5 million and include the following:

  • $50 million over 10 years for continued implementation of the National Inuit Suicide Prevention Strategy and $5 million per year ongoing;
  • $125.5 million over 10 years for an Inuit-led post-secondary education strategy and $21.8 million per year ongoing; and
  • $220 million over five years to provide important health and social services to Inuit children.

In addition, ITK is pleased with the commitment included in the budget to support universal high-speed internet access for all Canadians by 2030. Infrastructure in Inuit Nunangat lags behind that of all other OECD countries with Arctic territory. While Budget 2019 proposes a one-time transfer of $2.2 billion in infrastructure investments for communities through the federal Gas Tax Fund, ITK is deeply disappointed with the continued exclusion of Inuit from infrastructure investment and decision-making opportunities in our homelands.


March 19, 2019


Métis

Budget 2019 Métis Commitments

Significant Budget 2019 federal investments in Métis Nation priority areas. Among the highlights of the documents are:

  • “$30 million to recognize the contribution of Métis veterans to the country’s Second World War efforts and to commemorate the sacrifices and achievements of all Métis veterans”;
  • “A Métis Nation-led post-secondary education strategy consisting of financial assistance for Métis Nations students through an investment of $362.0 million over ten years, and $40.0 million per year ongoing”;
  • “$50 million over five years, starting in 2019–20, to enhance the funding of the Métis Capital Corporations to support the start-up and expansion of Métis small and medium-sized enterprises”;
  • A new Indigenous Growth Fund of up to $100 million that will allow all Aboriginal Financial Institutions, including Métis Capital Corporations to support more Indigenous entrepreneurs, and more ambitious projects”; and
  • Support for a distinctions-based approach to Indigenous language revitalization projects with $333.7 million over five years to preserve, promote and revitalize Indigenous languages, including Michif, the traditional language spoken by the Métis

March 8, 2019


Inuit

Prime Minster apology for events leading to Tuberculosis crisis

Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today apologized on behalf of the Government of Canada to Inuit for its actions during the tuberculosis epidemic from the 1940s to the 1960s. During this period, thousands of Inuit were sent away from their communities for tuberculosis treatment in southern Canada, where they were cut off from their language, their culture, their families, and their home. In too many cases, when people passed away during treatment, they were buried far from home, leaving families with no knowledge of the fate of their loved ones
https://pm.gc.ca/en/news/news-releases/2019/03/08/prime-minister-delivers-apology-inuit-federal-governments-management


January 11, 2019


Inuit

Canada apology for forced relocation of Ahiarmiut Inuit

Nunatsiaq News – Last summer the Ahiarmiut won a settlement from the federal government worth about $5M as a result of protracted negotiations that followed a lawsuit they had filed in 2008. The upcoming apology on January 22, 2021 is part of that settlement. In their lawsuit, the Ahiarmiut said the Canadian government, with the RCMP and “various commercial operations,” forcibly relocated the Ahiarmiut multiple times among various places in the southern Kivalliq region.

“The relocations resulted in malnutrition, starvation and many deaths,” the release said.


January 11, 2019


First Nations

Directive on Civil Litigation

The Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, issued the Directive on Civil Litigation Involving Indigenous Peoples. The Directive will guide the Government of Canada’s legal approaches, positions and decisions taken in civil litigation involving Aboriginal and treaty rights, and the Crown’s obligation towards Indigenous peoples. This is to ensure the Government’s legal positions are consistent with its commitments, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Canadian values.

Consistent with the Principles Respecting the Government of Canada’s Relationship with Indigenous Peoples, the Directive emphasizes the importance of resolving conflicts expeditiously and collaboratively, reducing the use of litigation and the courts.

This Directive pursues the following objectives:

  • advancing reconciliation,
  • recognizing rights,
  • upholding the honour of the Crown, and
  • respecting and advancing Indigenous self-determination and self-governance.

These objectives, and the guidelines for litigation counsel they promote, are interrelated.
https://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/csj-sjc/ijr-dja/dclip-dlcpa/litigation-litiges.html


January 11, 2019


Métis

Directive on Civil Litigation

The Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, issued the Directive on Civil Litigation Involving Indigenous Peoples. The Directive will guide the Government of Canada’s legal approaches, positions and decisions taken in civil litigation involving Aboriginal and treaty rights, and the Crown’s obligation towards Indigenous peoples. This is to ensure the Government’s legal positions are consistent with its commitments, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Canadian values. Consistent with the Principles Respecting the Government of Canada’s Relationship with Indigenous Peoples, the Directive emphasizes the importance of resolving conflicts expeditiously and collaboratively, reducing the use of litigation and the courts.

This Directive pursues the following objectives:

  • advancing reconciliation,
  • recognizing rights,
  • upholding the honour of the Crown, and
  • respecting and advancing Indigenous self-determination and self-governance.

These objectives, and the guidelines for litigation counsel they promote, are interrelated.
See also for details on Litigation Strategies.
https://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/csj-sjc/ijr-dja/dclip-dlcpa/litigation-litiges.html


November 29, 2018


Inuit

Expanding the Circle: What Reconciliation and Inclusive Growth Can Mean for Inuit and Canada

This conference brought together key leaders from across Inuit Nunangat to develop a united call to action on steps to achieve Inuit economic reconciliation, and was hosted with the assistance of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK). Topics included:

  • Inuit right to economic development and prosperity;
  • Inuit business and government procurement; and
  • Inuit economic development and government policy and programming.

https://ppforum.ca/event/expanding_the_circle/


November 28, 2018


First Nations

M”kmaw Nation Rights

Ottawa is committed to advancing the Mi’kmaw Nation and recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ inherent right to self-determination, a key federal official told a First Nations self-governance summit in Halifax Wednesday. The three-day event, which wraps up Thursday, is focused on finding a pathway to nationhood for Indigenous Peoples in the Atlantic region known as Mi’kma’ki.


November 14, 2018


Métis

Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework Cancelled

CBC – The Liberal government won’t be tabling legislation to create its promised Federal Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework this fall as previously planned. Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett’s office, which has the lead on the file, issued a statement saying work would continue to develop the framework to enshrine Section 35 rights in the Constitution in federal law.


November 14, 2018


First Nations

Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Frwamework

The Liberal government won’t be tabling legislation to create its promised Federal Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework this fall as previously planned. Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett’s office, which has the lead on the file, issued a statement saying work would continue to develop the framework to enshrine Section 35 rights in the Constitution in federal law.


August 21, 2018


First Nations

Open Letter to PM Trudeau

CBC – Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, now director of the University of British Columbia’s Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre, Wilton Littlechild, former commissioner with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and Ed John, grand chief of the First Nations Summit Task Group in B.C., sent a letter to Prime Minister Trudeau calling for a reset of the process to create the framework. Paul Chartrand, a former commissioner from the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, said it appears Ottawa is still operating under the idea that the ability for an Indigenous nation to self-govern flows from federal authority. “Section 35 is a political consensus in Canada that the rights of Aboriginal peoples are affirmed and recognized, that includes the affirmation or recognition of the inherent authority of Aboriginal people to govern themselves,” said Chartrand, who is Mé​t​is and a retired law professor.


May 24, 2018


First Nations

dermiNation Moving Beyond the Indian Act

The first Indigenous-led summit to explore moving beyond the Indian Act closed today with a strong call for First Nations to exercise their self-determination and to forge a new path for their people. “We have heard loud and clear that moving beyond the Indian Act must start at the community level with the full engagement of our communities,” said NAN Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler. “The Government of Canada must move aside and support our people to design solutions from the ground up. Anything less is paternalistic and goes against everything we’ve been talking about for the past two days. We are not going to accept another federally dictated process where First Nation leaders are summoned to meet and given the option to take it or leave without true consultation.”


May 23, 2018


First Nations

dermiNation Moving Beyond the Indian Act

Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) and Osgoode Law School have collaborated to organize the first-ever Indigenous-led summit that will bring together leaders to create a plan for moving beyond the Indian Act. “determiNation” is described as a national conference to plan for a new relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples based on rights, recognition and reconciliation. This conference will be structured around the themes of premises, principles, and institutional, legislative, and constitutional mechanisms, with the goal of creating a plan of action. Representatives from the Government of Canada including Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett and Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould are expected. Additional speakers and facilitators will be announced in coming weeks.


May 16, 2018


First Nations

First Nations Fiscal Management Act (FNMA) and the Framework Agreement on First Nation Land Management (FA)

Our Lands, Our Jurisdiction, Our Institutions: First Nations Leading the Way
First Nations who have chosen to work beyond the Indian Act are coming together to set the stage for the next generation of First Nations led initiatives that will support our jurisdiction and expanded government powers for Indigenous communities. Currently 276 First Nations, from all regions in Canada, are participating in either the FMA or the FA. At this pivotal time in history, this meeting will showcase trailblazing First Nations at the forefront of expanding jurisdiction and will highlight their achievements in working beyond the Indian Act in using First Nation-led agreements and legislation to improve their economies through greater fiscal independence, improved financial management, debenture financing, and sound land governance. The goals of the meeting are to bring First Nations leaders together to:

  • Share institutions tools and support services
  • Learn about First Nations success stories working outside of the Indian Act
  • Unify a collective voice for First Nations led initiatives and innovations
  • Set a clear path forward for building prosperous and vibrant First Nation communities

April 13, 2018


First Nations

Speech to BC Business Council

Perhaps most importantly, however, a shift to recognition of rights, including Indigenous self-determination and the inherent right of self-government, means that Canada will be an active supporter in the building and re-building of Indigenous nations and governments. We will finally be active partners in supporting Indigenous Nations and governments as they do the work of defining and clarifying their constitutions, laws, and decision-making processes, the structures they will work through, and how they will govern as part of historic rights-bearing groups, including those with historic treaties.
https://www.canada.ca/en/department-justice/news/2018/04/the-recognition-and-implementation-of-rights-framework-talk-1.htm


March 28, 2018


Inuit

2018 Budget for Bi-lateral Meetings

$13.7M/2 years to fund bilateral meetings with three national Indigenous groups. Budget 2018 is investing $74.9 million over five years.


March 27, 2018


Métis

Métis Nation Summit on Child Welfare

Government of Canada on its announcement today to commence direct dialogue with the MNC Governing Members on the over-representation of Métis children and youth in the child welfare systems in Ontario and the four western provinces. The Métis Nation-sponsored Summit on Child and Family Services brought together practitioners, social workers, elders, youth and leaders of the Métis Nation to discuss the social and economic situation of families whose children find themselves in the care of provincial child and family services systems. Minister Philpott Minister of Indigenous Services, announced $ 1 million in funding to the Métis National Council to support their consultation efforts towards culturally appropriate child welfare reform


March 19, 2018


Métis

Second Crown-Métis Bilateral Meeting

Discussed the implementation of the investments in Budget 2018 which will advance key Métis Nation priorities set out in the Canada-Métis Nation Accord. Ministers and Métis Nation leaders also actioned further work on accords to implement Budget commitments in relation to housing, early learning and childcare and Indigenous skills employment and training. All parties participated in meaningful discussions and agreed to undertake joint work and policy co-development on Métis health, education, child and family services, economic development and the new fiscal relationship, all of which are priority areas set out for the second year of the Accord.


February 14, 2018


Métis

Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework

Prime Minister Trudeau announced that the government will develop in full partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Métis people a new recognition and implementation of Indigenous rights framework that will include new ways to recognize and implement Indigenous rights. This will include new recognition and implementation of rights legislation. Going forward recognition of rights will guide all government interactions with Indigenous peoples.

The contents of the framework that we build together will be determined through a national engagement led by the Minister of Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs with support from the Minister of Justice. While the results of this engagement will guide what the final framework looks like we believe that as a starting point it should include new legislation and a policy that would make the recognition and implementation of rights the basis for all relations between Indigenous peoples and the federal government moving forward.

This framework gives us the opportunity to build new mechanisms, to recognize Indigenous governments and ensure rigorous full and meaningful implementation of treaties and other agreements. With this framework we have a chance to develop new tools to support the rebuilding of Indigenous communities, nations and governments and advance self-determination including the inherent right of self-government.
https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1536350959665/1536350978933


February 14, 2018


First Nations

Recognition and Implementation of Rights Framework.

Prime Minister Trudeau announced that the government will develop in full partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Métis people a new recognition and implementation of Indigenous rights framework that will include new ways to recognize and implement Indigenous rights. This will include new recognition and implementation of rights legislation. Going forward recognition of rights will guide all government interactions with Indigenous peoples. The contents of the framework that we build together will be determined through a national engagement led by the Minister of Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs with support from the Minister of Justice. While the results of this engagement will guide what the final framework looks like we believe that as a starting point it should include new legislation and a policy that would make the recognition and implementation of rights the basis for all relations between Indigenous peoples and the federal government moving forward.
https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1536350959665/1539959903708?wbdisable=true


December 4, 2017


First Nations

ISC Health Priorities

Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott has officially been given responsibility for overseeing the delivery of First Nations and Inuit health services. Key priorities of the new Ministry of Indigenous Services Canada:

  • Improving Health outcomes
  • Quality Education
  • Child & Family Services
  • Reliable Infrastructure, including Housing & Water
  • A New Fiscal Relationship

November 8, 2017


Métis

“Expanding the Circle: Inclusive Economic Growth”

In partnership with the National Indigenous Economic Development Board, the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association, and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), the Public Policy Forum presented a conference “Expanding the Circle: what reconciliation and inclusive economic growth can mean for the Métis Nation and Canada”.

Ideas were presented on:

  • How rights recognition and reconciliation can stimulate economic development and growth
  • The legal concepts and cases that are helping to shape the foundation of economic reconciliation
  • How the MMF has leveraged Métis Nation rights recognition into significant procurement opportunities with Manitoba Hydro and pipeline giant Enbridge through joint ventures with major contractors on projects like the Bipole III transmission line and Enbridge’s Line 3 Replacement.

The conference also featured panel discussions with insights and ideas from Métis women business leaders and Métis Nation youth leaders.
http://www.naedb-cndea.com/reports/naedb_report_reconciliation_27_7_billion.pdf


August 28, 2017


First Nations

New INAC organization

New INAC organization: Carolyn Bennett is now Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, and former Health Minister Jane Philpott will become the Minister of Indigenous Services (recommendation from Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples in 1996). The current Indigenous Affairs Department will be dissolved through legislation to end the Indian Act


August 21, 2017


Métis

Common Statement of Principles on Shared Health Priorities

Acknowledges the commitment of federal, provincial and territorial governments to continue working with First Nations, Inuit and Métis to improve access to health services and health outcomes of Indigenous peoples and discuss progress.
https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/hc-sc/documents/corporate/transparency_229055456/health-agreements/principles-shared-health-priorities.pdf


June 12, 2017


First Nations

Common Statement of Shared Health Priorities

Common Statement of Principles on Shared Health Priorities: Acknowledges the commitment of federal, provincial and territorial governments to continue working with First Nations, Inuit and Métis to improve access to health services and health outcomes of Indigenous peoples and discuss progress.
https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/hc-sc/documents/corporate/transparency_229055456/health-agreements/principles-shared-health-priorities.pdf


April 13, 2017


Métis

Canada-Métis Nation Accord

Official signing of Canada-Métis Nation Accord marks a significant step towards a renewed government-to-government relationship based on recognition of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership. It outlines the ways in which the Government of Canada and the Métis National Council and its Governing Members will work together to set priorities and develop policy in areas of shared interest. The Accord will bring a coordinated focus across the federal government in setting priorities and obtaining concrete actions and tangible results. The Accord established annual meetings with the Prime Minister, semi-annual meetings with key Cabinet ministers and quarterly meetings with Assistant Deputy Ministers and other senior officials.
https://pm.gc.ca/en/canada-metis-nation-accord


February 15, 2017


First Nations

First Nations Economic Reconciliation

Expanding the Circle: First Nations Economic Reconciliation – Presented by National Indigenous Economic Development Board (NIEDB), in partnership with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA), Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) and the Public Policy Forum (PPF). Economic reconciliation means ensuring that Indigenous Peoples are not excluded from participating in and benefitting from Canada’s prosperity. The economic inclusion of Indigenous Peoples in Canada’s economy is not only a way of addressing past wrongs, but also an investment that can benefit all Canadians.

In fact, closing the significant opportunity gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians will annually boost Canada’s GDP by $27.7 billion.


January 12, 2017


Inuit

Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada MOU

Federal Government and the Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada (PIWC), signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to establish a whole-of-government relationship to address issues of common concern that directly affect the well-being and safety of Inuit women and children across Canada.
https://www.canada.ca/en/indigenous-northern-affairs/news/2017/06/canada_and_pauktuutitinuitwomenofcanadasignnewpartnershipagreeme.html.


July 21, 2016


Métis

Métis Section 35 Rights Framework

Ministerial Special Representative’s Report on Reconciliation with Métis Section 35 Rights Framework engagement with Métis governments and organizations, provincial and territorial governments and other interested parties and made recommendations on the development of a Section 35 Métis rights framework as well as other initiatives to advance reconciliation with Métis. His mandate also included identifying options for moving forward with the MMF on the implementation of the Supreme Court of Canada’s 2013 judgment in Manitoba Métis Federation et al. v. Canada.
https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/DAM/DAM-CIRNAC-RCAANC/DAM-PPLCOM/STAGING/texte-text/report_reconciliation_1471371154433_eng.pdf


June 10, 2016


Métis

First annual Federal, Provincial, Territorial and Indigenous Forum

Commit to all indigenous groups: AFN, Métis National Council, Inuit Tapariit Kanatami, Native Women’s Association of Canada and Indigenous People’s Assembly of Canada (IPAC).


June 10, 2016


First Nations

First Annual Federal, Provincial, Territorial and Indigenous Forum

Discussed the next steps in the permanent bilateral mechanism process. Commit to three cabinet level meetings per year including one with PM. Funding to establish mechanisms for bilateral meetings with each of the three national indigenous groups: Assembly of First Nations, Métis National Council and Inuit Tapariit Kaanatami


December 15, 2015


Inuit

Release of TRC Final Report

Commit to a “renewed” (i.e. Nation-to-Nation) relationship with First Nations, Métis and Inuit.
http://www.trc.ca/assets/pdf/Honouring_the_Truth_Reconciling_for_the_Future_July_23_2015.pdf


December 15, 2015


First Nations

Release of TRC Final Report

Release of the TRC Final report
https://nctr.ca/reports2.php


December 15, 2015


Métis

Response to TRC Final Report

Commit to a “renewed” (i.e. Nation-to-Nation) relationship with First Nations, Métis and Inuit.


December 8, 2015


First Nations

Address to AFN National Assembly

Address to the AFN National Assembly – Promise to implement all 94 C2A + remove 2% funding cap, review legislation introduced by Harper Government, commitment to a renewed relationship (i.e. Nation-to-Nation) with Canada’s First Nations, Métis and Inuit


June 2, 2015


Métis

Release of TRC Summary Report

“Honouring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future: Summary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission” released.


June 2, 2015


First Nations

Release of TRC Summary Report

Releae of “Honouring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future: Summary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission”


June 2, 2015


Inuit

TRC Final Report

Honouring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future: Summary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
http://www.trc.ca/assets/pdf/Honouring_the_Truth_Reconciling_for_the_Future_July_23_2015.pdf


April 1, 2014


Inuit

The Qikiqtani Truth Commission

The Qikiqtani Truth Commission is the first Inuit-sponsored and Inuit-led initiative of its kind. It is also a rare example of a comprehensive social justice inquiry led by an Aboriginal organization. The Final report of the Qikiqtani Truth Commission “Achieving Saimaqatigiingniq” listed 25 recommendations under 4 themes to initiate an Inuit Truth and Reconciliation process.
• Acknowledging and Healing Past Wrongs
• Strengthening Inuit Governance
• Strengthening Inuit Culture, and
• Creating Healthy Communities.
https://www.qtcommission.ca/sites/default/files/public/thematic_reports/thematic_reports_english_final_report.pdf


June 11, 2008


First Nations

PM Harper Apology

Issued a formal apology for the Residential School system
https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100015644/1100100015649


June 11, 2008


Métis

PM Harper Apology

Issued a formal apology for the Residential School system
https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100015644/1100100015649