United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (43-44)

Current Reality

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) is an international instrument adopted by the United Nations on September 13, 2007, to enshrine the rights that “constitute the minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world.” Endorsed to date by nearly 150 countries, including Canada, the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is the most comprehensive international instrument on the fundamental rights and freedoms of Indigenous peoples (culture, identity, religion, language, territory, health, education, cooperation) impacting approximately 370M indigenous peoples.

Three distinct lenses are required to assess how UNDRIP is advancing in Canada: federal government, provincial and territory governments and First Nations, Métis and Inuit on what the various stakeholder’s actions really mean.

Federal Government Updates
April 7, 2022: Budget 2022 invests $75M over 5 years to implement the United Nations Declaration Act

June 21, 2021: Bill C-15 – An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act receives Royal Assent and becomes law.
April 19, 2021: Budget 2021 proposes $31.5M over two years, starting in 2021-22 to support the co-development of an Action Plan with Indigenous partners to implement this legislation and to achieve the objectives of the United Nations Declaration.

Provincial and Territory Updates
Mar. 30, 2022 – BC Government releases UNDRIP Action  Plan 2022-2027 with 89 Calls to Actions under four themes.

Dec. 2020: NWT – A new Legislative Development Protocol from the Intergovernmental Council of the Northwest Territories gives Indigenous governments a seat at the table for decisions about land and resource management. The protocol, the first agreement of its kind in Canada, supports the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples by respecting, consulting and collaborating with Indigenous Governments on land and resource management.

Nov. 7, 2020: Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Québec and New Brunswick – The provincial governments of objected to the introduction of Bill C-15 “An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples” for First Reading in the House of Commons. They objected to the six-week timeframe to review the bill. As the Minister of Justice David Lametti pointed out, UNDRIP was adopted by the UN in 2007, endorsed by Canada in 2016 and spent two years being debated in the House of Commons and the Senate after being tabled by MP Romeo Saganash on April 21, 2016.

Indigenous Updates:

Dec. 4, 2020: AFN Update on progress of UNDRIP legislation + detailed background information and comparison between Bill C-15 and Bill C262
https://nationtalk.ca/story/national-chief-bulletin-update-on-federal-bill-to-advance-implementation-of-the-united-nations-declaration-on-the-rights-of-indigenous-peoples


0/2 CTAs have been completed to date




43

Fully adopt and implement UNDRIP as the framework for reconcilation

In Progress

44

Develop national action plan and strategies to achieve UNDRIP goals

In Progress

Featured Updates


Current Problems with
United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (43-44)


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Explore Problems by Theme


Bill C-15 Action Plan

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Problems with BC UNDRIP Bill

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Indigenous Opposition to UNDRIP

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Federal Conservative Party Opposition

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Provincial Opposition

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