Child Welfare (1-5): Background Content

Coroner Reports


September 1, 2018


ON

Expert Panel Recommendations

“SAFE WITH INTERVENTION” – REPORT OF THE EXPERT PANEL ON THE DEATHS OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH IN RESIDENTIAL PLACEMENTS SEPTEMBER 2018.
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF CORONER
In the first six months of 2017, five young people died in residential placements. All of the young people were in the care of a Children’s Aid Society or Indigenous Child Wellbeing Society (Society), and all of them struggled with mental health challenges. The OCC identified a group of 12 deaths of young people in the care of a Children’s Aid Society or Indigenous Child Wellbeing Society (Society) that occurred while they were in residential placements between January 1, 2014 and July 31, 2017. All of the young people had a history of mental health challenges. 8 of them were Indigenous.

To inform the investigation of the deaths and provide an opportunity for recommendations to prevent further deaths, the OCC established the Expert Panel on the Deaths of Children and Youth in Residential Placements (Panel). The Panel was tasked with:

  • reviewing and assessing the services and supports provided to the 12 young people;
  • identifying any commonalities and/or trends arising out of the review and assessment of the deaths;
  • identifying any systemic issues or concerns arising out of the review and assessment of the deaths;
  • providing expert opinion on the extent to which current and forthcoming plans, activities, legislation, regulations, policies and practices, including the activities outlined in Safe and Caring Places for Children and Youth: Ontario’s Blueprint for Building a New System of Licensed Residential Services and initiatives underway in the child welfare and children’s mental health sectors address any issues or concerns identified; and
  • making recommendations that may assist in preventing further deaths.

The Panel developed five recommendations they believe would make a fundamental difference to Ontario’s young people and the overall burden on Ontario’s social service system – now and over the longer-term.

https://www.ontario.ca/document/safe-intervention-report-expert-panel-deaths-children-and-youth-residential-placements


November 2, 2016


ON

Kaitlynn’s Principle Jury Recommendations

VERDICT OF CORONER’S JURY: KATELYNN ANGEL SAMPSON
An Act to enshrine Katelynn’s Principle as the guiding principle for decisions affecting children would recognize every child in the child welfare, youth justice and education systems as an individual with rights who must be at the centre of all decision-making affecting them. The private member’s bill was introduced by Monique Taylor, MPP for Hamilton Mountain. Nov. 2, 2016. The coroner’s jury made 173 recommendations.

In honour of Katelynn, a child whose identity and voice was not heard in her life, the first of the jury’s recommendations was named Katelynn’s Principle. Katelynn’s Principle states that children must be at the centre when they are receiving services through the child welfare, justice and/or education systems.

The Child, Youth and Family Services Act, 2016 gives teeth to the recommendations coming out of Katelynn’s inquest, putting children front and centre when it comes to their care. When unveiling the new Act, Michael Coteau, the Minister of Children and Youth Services, told reporters that it still “baffles” him that a system is in place were children don’t get a say in their care. He called the proposed legislation “the biggest game-changer in child protection in decades.”

https://oacas.libguides.com/c.php?g=703399&p=5012591


Other Background Content By Theme


Child and Youth Advocate Recommendations

The Canadian Council of Child and Youth Advocates (CCCYA) is an association of children's advocates from across Canada who have mandates to advance the rights of children and youth and to promote their voice. Although the names of the offices and their legislative mandates vary, the advocates are all independent officers of the legislature in their respective jurisdictions. Through the Council, they identify areas of mutual concern, and work to develop ways to address issues at a national level.

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Child Welfare Reports

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