Child Welfare (1-5): Background Content

Child Welfare Reports


October 1, 2019


NT

2018-19 Child and Family Services Annual Report

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES 2018-2019 GOVERNMENT OF NWT

In October 2018, the Auditor General of Canada completed their report on Child and Family Services in the Northwest Territories, which highlighted areas of deficit and recommendations requiring continued attention. The Auditor General’s report along with internal reviews and stakeholder feedback has shaped quality improvement initiatives over the past year. For example, a revised accountability framework was implemented in January 2019 to reflect the new authority structure and feedback from Child Welfare Practitioners to support better outcomes for children and families. This framework serves as a roadmap to underscore accountability, and clarify roles and responsibilities between the HSSAs and the Department.
Area of Focus

  • Quality Assurance
  • Training
  • Human Resources
  • Engagement

Service Delivery and Child Protection and Prevention Practice
https://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/hss/files/resources/2018-19-cfs-director-report.pdf


June 28, 2018


AB

Action Plan to Transform Child Welfare

A Stronger, Safer Tomorrow: A Public Action Plan for the Ministerial Panel on Child Intervention’s Final Recommendations

On any given day in Alberta, more than 10,000 children and youth receive child intervention services, and roughly six out of every 10 of these young people are Indigenous

The Ministerial Panel on Child Intervention was an unprecedented, open and transparent review of the child intervention system. For more than 12 months, an all-party panel heard from Indigenous leaders, families, communities, international experts, staff and stakeholders. Less than a month after the panel gave its first recommendations, I tabled legislation to ensure the independent Child and Youth Advocate would review every single death of a child in care. Bill 18: The Child Protection and Accountability Act, was proclaimed in March 2018.
The second phase of the panel delivered 26 final recommendations derived by consensus, and aimed at reducing the overrepresentation of Indigenous children and youth receiving services. The action plan I am unveiling today provides a pathway to a safer, stronger child intervention system that better protects children and youth and supports their families. All of the panel’s recommendations have clear actions designed to move our province forward, 16 of which will be completed this fiscal year. These actions improve supports for families and make the system stronger, safer and more accountable. They will include full implementation of Jordan’s Principle. They develop new assessment processes for kinship caregivers. They spell out some of the work needed to end the service gap on reserves. They include updates to the Child, Youth and Family Enhancement Act. And they will create an Indigenous advisory body to guide every step of the way.

Children’s Services will lead the implementation of this public action plan, but we will not be alone. I will continue to advocate to the federal government and collaborate with my cross-ministry colleagues. Most importantly, Indigenous people will be involved at every step of implementation, jointly working together to develop solutions that meet the needs specific to their communities. I am wholeheartedly committed to reconciliation. To correct historical injustices, we will support Indigenous families and strive to keep their children safe and at home whenever possible.

The report identifies 25 recommendations divided into:

  • Short-term: To be completed in 2018-19
  • Mid-Term: To be compeleted by 2020
  • Long-Term:To be completed by 2022

https://open.alberta.ca/dataset/212cd3e9-c496-4ecd-b254-5bbe7b13aa7d/resource/7a7ab135-21e0-44aa-9112-e9a458a33103/download/stronger-safer-tomorrow-public-action-plan.pdf


October 23, 2018


NT

Auditor-General Report on Child and Family Services in NWT

OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR GENERAL OF CANADA: CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES IN THE NWT, 2018
A complex range of issues—such as family violence, poverty, alcohol and drug misuse, and the intergenerational effects of the former residential school system—put some children and families in the Northwest Territories at risk and in need of child protection and family services. According to the Department of Health and Social Services, an average of about 1,000 children per year have received either protection or prevention services under the Act over the past 10 years.
Our audit determined that there continued to be serious deficiencies in the delivery of child and family services in the Northwest Territories. We found that many of the services provided to children and families were worse than when we examined them in 2014.

Audit Results:

Services for children in parental care

  • Health and Social Services authorities did not meet key requirements to protect children and support families

Services for children in temporary and permanent care

  • Health and Social Services authorities did not fulfill their parental responsibilities to protect and care for children in temporary and permanent care
  • Inadequate supervision of children placed out of the territory put some children’s safety at risk
    Youth leaving the system received new support

Foster care

  • Serious deficiencies persisted in foster care monitoring and support

The system for delivering child and family services

  • System changes did not result in better services for children and families
    The Department had still not determined the financial and human resources needed to deliver the required child and family services

http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/nwt_201810_e_43169.html#p32

Govvernment Response to the Auditor-Geberal Report: Feb, 26, 2019
To address the issues identified by the OAG, the Department of Health and Social Services has committed to achieving major, much-needed change within the next two years.
https://www.ntassembly.ca/sites/assembly/files/19-02-25_cr_12-18-3_report_on_the_review_of_the_2018_report_of_the_auditor_general_of_canada_to_thenwt_legislative_assembly-cfs_final__0.pdf


June 1, 2021


NL

Child Protection Services for Inuit Children

Report on Child Welfare Services to Indigenous Children, Youth and Families 2019-20

This report is in response to Recommendation 33 of the Office of the Child and Youth Advocate’s report “A Long Wait for Change: Independent Review of Child Welfare Services to Inuit Children in Newfoundland and Labrador (2019)”. As the first comprehensive public reporting of information about child welfare services to Indigenous children, youth and families, it sets the baseline from which the Department of Children, Seniors and Social Development and Indigenous Governments and Organizations will continue working together to reduce the overrepresentation of Indigenous children and youth in care.
The Report provides information to aid in understanding Indigenous client demographics and reasons for child welfare involvement. As the report began with a focus on Inuit children and youth; however, expanded to include all Indigenous children and youth receiving services from the Department of Children, Seniors and Social Development. This report provides baseline data and is simply the first of many important steps in responding to the recommendations outlined in the reports noted and achieving CSSD’s commitment to reduce the number of Indigenous children and youth in care and improve outcomes for those involved with the child welfare system.

This report is organized in three parts.

  • The first outlines contextual information regarding Indigenous people in Newfoundland and Labrador, as well as an overview of relevant child welfare programs, legislation, and policy.
  • The second provides data regarding Newfoundland and Labrador’s child welfare services in relation to Indigenous children, youth, and families.
  • The third provides a summary of new and promising approaches that CSSD, in collaboration with Indigenous Governments and Organizations, is advancing and a focus on next steps moving forward.

To acknowledge the importance of culture and cultural connections and strengthen service delivery to Indigenous children, youth, and their families, the CYFA implemented a number of legislative changes, which included:

  • Defining Indigenous children and Youth
  • Preserving the Unique Cultural Identities of Indigenous Children and Youth
  • Cultural Connection Plan
  • Indigenous Representative
  • Placement Considerations
  • Information Sharing

Delegating Functions and Services to Indigenous Governments/Organizations
https://www.assembly.nl.ca/business/electronicdocuments/ReportOnChildWelfareServicesToIndigenousChildrenYouthAndFamilies2019-20.pdf


November 1, 2019


QC

Child Welfare Services in Montreal

ONE STEP FORWARD, TWO STEPS BACK: CHILD WELFARE SERVICES FOR INDIGENOUS CLIENTELE LIVING IN MONTREAL”
The 17 recommendations align specifically with 22 of the 29 recommendations specific for youth from the Viens Commission.
Recommendations for Education of Non-Indigenous Staff, Leaders and Decision-Makers (3 recommendations align with 8 Viens Commission recommendations)
Recommendations fo Representation (7 align with 4 Viens Commission recommendations)
Recommendations on Policy Level Changes (7 align with 10 Viens Commission recommendations)

WHAT WE EXPECT FROM THE CIUSSS-ODIM:

  • To meet with the research team in early 2020 to provide guidance, and we expect a progress report annually from the CIUSSS detailing which recommendations have been addressed and how.
    The first progress report by December 15, 2020.
  • Support as needed when we reach out to Premier François Legault and the Laurent Commission regarding changes that need to be made at the provincial level, similar to Ontario’s Indigenous Children and Youth Strategy.
  • Support as we continue to make our demands to various organizations and provincial bodies by co-signing our letters/documents, advocating at our side, making any necessary meetings/phone calls that will move these changes forward, for example, to the PIJ system so that we have a more efficient and effective way of collecting information on the identity of Indigenous children and families.

https://www.csdepj.gouv.qc.ca/fileadmin/Fichiers_clients/Documents_deposes_a_la_Commission/P-101_Report_2019_One_step_forward_two_steps_back_Child_Welfare_services.pdf


October 15, 2015


BC

From Root Causes to Root Solutions

INDIGENOUS RESILIENCE, CONNECTEDNESS AND REUNIFICATION – FROM ROOT CAUSES TO ROOT SOLUTIONS A Report on Indigenous Child Welfare in British Columbia
Final Report of Special Advisor Grand Chief Ed John

“Your government asked for advice on Indigenous child welfare. “There are too many Indigenous children in care and something needs to be done,” I was told in the lead up to my appointment last year. While I was not sure I was the best person to give this advice, my immediate reaction then was to say, “Keep the children at home. Do not remove them; and see those in care returned back home.” I had a sense then that the best advice would come from those who were directly impacted by the existing laws, regulations, policies and practices of the state. My time as Special Advisor has served to reinforce this belief.” Special Advisor Grand Chief Ed George

According to current Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD) data, less than 10% of the child population in BC is Indigenous. And yet, as of May 2016, 60.1% (4,445) of the total (7,246) children and youth in care in BC were Indigenous. According to MCFD, in May 2016, of the 3,858 children and youth in care who were permanent wards, 2,609 (68%) were Indigenous.

INDIGENOUS CHILDREN AND YOUTH IN BC ARE OVER 15 TIMES MORE LIKELY TO BE IN CARE THAN NON-INDIGENOUS CHILDREN AND YOUTH.

This report is organized under 10 areas for focused action. It identifies the challenges and opportunities present in each of these areas, as well as the root causes linked to many of these existing challenges, which overlap substantively. The reader should therefore be attentive to the linkages and the relationships between all of the recommended actions.

Ares of Focused Action:

  1. Direct Support for Indigenous children, parents and families in all Indigenous communities
  2. Access to justice and child and family Servivces
  3. A new fiscala relationship – investing in patterns of connectedness
  4. Prevention Services – keeping families connected
  5. Reunification and permancy planning
  6. Nurturing a sense of belonging and priorityzing culture and language – care plans as a tool for building comnnectednes
  7. Early years – early investment in establishing patterns of connectedness
  8. Indigenous peoples and jurisdiction over child welfare
  9. The existing policy framework – shifting towards patterns of connectedness
  10. A national strategy for Indigenous child welfare

The Final Report presents 85 decommendations:
https://fns.bc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Final-Report-of-Grand-Chief-Ed-John-re-Indig-Child-Welfare-in-BC-November-2016.pdf


Other Background Content By Theme


Child and Youth Advocate Recommendations

The Canadian Council of Child and Youth Advocates (CCCYA) is an association of children's advocates from across Canada who have mandates to advance the rights of children and youth and to promote their voice. Although the names of the offices and their legislative mandates vary, the advocates are all independent officers of the legislature in their respective jurisdictions. Through the Council, they identify areas of mutual concern, and work to develop ways to address issues at a national level.

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Coroner Reports

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