Government Commitments to Truth and Reconciliation: Government Commitments

NU


March 25, 2022


Nunavut Partnership Committee

Nunavut Premier P.J. Akeeagok and Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. (NTI) President Aluki Kotierk signed a declaration to formalize the working relationship between the Government of Nunavut (GN) and NTI through the creation of the Nunavut Partnership Committee.

“This partnership declaration follows this week’s release of the Katujjiluta Mandate, which was developed in collaboration with Nunavut’s Inuit Organizations. I know that working together, we have the joint resolve and resources to tackle Nunavut’s historic inequities and to make our territory a better place for all Nunavummiut.”

Building on the Katujjiqatigiinniq Protocol, the creation of the Nunavut Partnership Committee (NPC) is an important step toward advancing shared interests for Inuit and Nunavummiut through collaborative action.

“The Nunavut Agreement created Nunavut as a place for Inuit economic, social and cultural well-being,” says Aluki Kotierk, President of NTI. “This declaration will see us working towards this vision with determination and coordination. We are better and will achieve more together.”

The overarching goal of this partnership is to foster Inuit prosperity. It will do so by identifying solutions, providing guidance, and addressing challenges. It is structured to ensure success through a unified approach that is based on partnership and accountability.

The GN and NTI have previously collaborated on the Clyde River Protocol in 1999, Iqqaanaijaqatigiit in 2004, Aajiiqatigiinniq in 2011, and the Katujjiqatigiinniq Protocol in 2020 to ensure positive working relationships between both parties.


September 27, 2019


Inuit

Nunavut Tunngavik 2018-2021 Priorities

We will seek to work with the Governments of Canada and Nunavut to achieve substantial and measurable progress towards the full implementation of Article 23 of the Nunavut Agreement. Inuit employment and full implementation of Article 23 are the essential means to address many of the prevailing issues in Inuit society today. Members also discussed the need to radically transform the government work force and the existing bureaucratic culture.

To make substantial progress on Inuit employment in the next three years, we will collaborate with the Governments to:

  • develop and implement robust Inuit Employment Plans and Pre-Employment Training Plans;
  • take concrete steps towards making Inuktut the primary language of work in the Government of Nunavut;
  • enact of an Inuit Employment Act; and
  • reform the primary education system in Nunavut.

We will seek to make significant progress in strengthening Inuktut in all aspects of life in Nunavut, including Nunavut’s education system, public service workplaces, and delivery of essential government programs and services. Inuit are rebuilding our pride in our Inuit identity which has been damaged by colonialism and past government policies of assimilation.

Inuktut is an essential and central part of rebuilding Inuit identity. Inuit culture, history, traditions and values are embodied in and conveyed through our language. It is well documented that Inuktut use has been in a state of decline. Urgent and serious efforts are needed to reverse this.

Therefore, it is essential that we try all available means, through urgent and concern actions, to make substantial progress towards:

  • making Inuktut the primary language of instruction in Nunavut schools;
  • making Inuktut an official language of Canada in Nunavut;
  • making Inuktut the primary language of work in government offices; and
  • making Inuktut the primary language for delivery of essential government programs and services including health care, education and justice in Nunavut;

We will seek to work with the Governments of Canada and Nunavut to create an education system that reflects and promotes Inuit priorities and Inuit culture. In order to keep our children in school it is crucial to develop school curriculum centered on Inuit culture, and to encourage and support Inuit children and youth to pursue and succeed in all levels of education.

To that end, we will seek to:

  • collaborate with the Government of Nunavut in the Education Act Review process to make important reforms in the primary education system in Nunavut that reflect Inuit priorities (e.g., measurable steps towards making Inuktut the primary language of instruction in Nunavut schools);
  • collaborate with the federal and territorial governments to make significant investment in new training programs for Inuktut-speaking teachers; and
  • collaborate with the federal and territorial governments to take significant steps to strengthen Inuktut in daycares in Nunavut.

We will seek to work with the Governments of Canada and Nunavut to make substantial progress in narrowing housing and other infrastructure gaps in Nunavut, and raising infrastructure standards in Nunavut up to national levels. There is an urgent need to establish the basic infrastructures in Nunavut that include but are not limited to:

  • Roads and Ports
  • Housing
  • Elders Facilities
  • Wildlife Research/Testing Facilities
  • Heritage/Culture Centres
  • Addition/Treatment Centres
  • Youth Facilities
  • Hydroelectric Facilities
  • Fiber Optics Network or High-Speed Internet

The lack of basic infrastructures has seriously impaired Nunavummiut’s ability to better themselves, to improve their well-being and standard of living, to fight poverty and food insecurity, and to compete in a modern economy.

In the next three years, we will:

  • collaborate with the governments to develop an Inuit Nunangat Housing Strategy, to supplement the National Housing Strategy and the GN’s Blueprint for Action on Housing;
  • collaborate with the governments to develop a Long-Term Infrastructure Strategy and to start early implementation of the Strategy and development of strategic projects; and
  • collaborate with governments and private sector to establish a strategic development fund for major infrastructure projects in Nunavut.

We will seek to work with the Governments of Canada and Nunavut to create Article 32 protocol to promote meaningful Inuit participation in the development of social and cultural policies and programs in Nunavut.
Government policies and programs must reflect and promote Inuit societal values, culture and traditions. Meaningful Inuit participation in this regard is an important means to redress past harm and historical wrongs that have been done to Inuit society, and to achieve the broader goal of reconciliation.


August 15, 2019


Inuit

Directive on Government Contracts

Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated (NTI) is pleased at the release of the new co-developed federal government procurement Directive relating to contracting activity in the Nunavut Settlement Area. Throughout the negotiations, NTI has consistently interpreted and defined the policy objectives under Article 24 as falling under three separate and independent pillars:

  • the right of Inuit to own and operate companies
  • the right of Inuit to work and be employed through government contracting, and;
  • the right of Inuit to undertake skills training and development, for the appropriate contracts

https://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pol/doc-eng.aspx?id=32610§ion=html


December 16, 2016


First Nations

Response to TRC Report

The legacy of residential schools has left lasting impact and trauma for Indigenous People across the country, and its effects are seen daily in Nunavut. Inuit have shown over and over that we are strong and resilient. Now is the time to resolve the issues of the past, and embrace hope for the future. I thank the TRC for their tireless work to bring this painful chapter of Canada’s history to light and their dedication to this important process over the last several years. Nunavut will continue to ensure the history of residential schools is taught in our schools, so our students understand the full extent of this period in our territory’s history.” Premier Peter Taptuna.