Government Commitments to Truth and Reconciliation: Government Commitments

MB


April 25, 2022


Hudson’s Bay Company transfers former flagship store to Southern Chiefs’ Organization

A Winnipeg landmark Rich in Symbolism Comes Under Indigenous Control

New York Times: The bay announced that it was giving the property and the building to Southern Chiefs Organization, which represents 34 Manitoba First Nations. Having secured about 100 million Canadian dollars in funding, the majority from the federal government, the Southern Chiefs have ambitious plans for the site: affordable housing, assisted living, a healing centre, a day care, a museum, meeting spaces and restaurants, among other amenities.

Above all, the Bay’s decision to hand over its former headquarters to a First Nations group in the city with Canada’s largest urban Indigenous population is deeply symbolic. The Bay, more than any other organization, was a driving force behind the European colonization of Canada. The company was founded in 1670 to exploit the fur trade in Rupert’s Land, an area that makes up about a third of present-day Canada. King Charles II, without consulting the Indigenous population, claimed the territory as England’s and gave it to his cousin. The company’s relationship with Indigenous people from that point on was one largely of exploitation.

“It’s quite proper that First Nations are being given this land back,” Grand Chief Jerry Daniels of the Southern Chiefs’ Organization told me. “I think it shows that corporate Canada has an interest in taking an active role in sort of rebuilding its relationship with Indigenous people.”

Chief Daniels told me that negotiations for the acquisition of the building went back at least 18 months. Early on, Chief Daniels said, he traveled to New York with, among others, Phil Fontaine, the former national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, to meet with Richard A. Baker, the real estate magnate who owns the department store chain. He said that in addition to agreeing to give the building to the group, Mr. Baker promised to work with the chiefs on its revival.

The plan for the renovation is in advanced stages, Chief Daniels said, though negotiations are still underway for additional funding of about 30 million Canadian dollars.

The often ill-defined concept of “land back” has become the focus of a lot of Indigenous people in recent years. Many Indigenous people define it as when governments return land — or crown land, as it is commonly called — to the First Nations and other Indigenous groups. Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, the acting head of the department of Indigenous studies at the University of Manitoba, said that the Bay project would not truly qualify as land back unless the federal government formally recognized the store as an urban reserve, or sovereign Indigenous territory.

But he nevertheless praised the project, known as Wehwehneh Bahgahkinahgohn, which he has not been involved in. “It’s a fantastic initiative,” he said. “People should be very proud.”

Professor Sinclair said that the project would benefit more than just Indigenous people, arguing that it would also be a boon to Winnipeg and its struggling downtown.

“Indigenous peoples will be reoccupying a space that is of important historical value to us,” he told me, “but they will also be cleaning up a mess that a big company left behind.”


October 19, 2021


Inuit

Funding for Manitoba Inuit Association

To assist in building capacity of the representative organization for Inuit living in Manitoba, the Manitoba government is providing $30,000 toward the Manitoba Inuit Association (MIA) to continue its work of enhancing the lives of Inuit in Manitoba and connecting Inuit to services that meet their evolving needs particularly in health care, social services and education,”

More than 1,000 Inuit call Manitoba home and more than 15,000 visits are made by Inuit travelling to Winnipeg hospitals every year from the Kivalliq region of Nunavut for health care and to pursue skills-training or post-secondary education opportunities,”

The MIA opened its doors in 2012 and works to strengthen Inuit language and culture in Manitoba.


October 8, 2021


First Nations

The Path to Reconciliation Act Amendments

The Manitoba government has introduced amendments to Bill 75, “the Path to Reconciliation Amendment Act” that would establish the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Calls for Justice as a key component of its approach to advancing truth and reconciliation in Manitoba. Under this legislation, Manitoba’s efforts are to be guided by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action and the principles set out in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.


July 6, 2021


Métis

Manitoba Métis Self-Government Recognition and Implementation Agreement

An agreement with Canada recognizing the Manitoba Métis Federation (MMF) as the existing democratically elected government of the Manitoba Métis. This agreement ensures that the MMF will continue to provide responsible and accountable self-government. The Agreement signed by Minister Carolyn Bennett and Manitoba Métis Federation President David Chartrand is Canada’s first Métis self- government agreement that gives immediate recognition to an existing Métis government.
https://www.mmf.mb.ca/wcm-docs/docs/news/manitoba_metis_self-government_recognition_and_implementation_agreement.pdf


May 28, 2021


Métis

Métis Flag

Winnipeg’s City Council voted unanimously to fly the flags of three Indigenous Nations, including the national flag of Métis Nation, at City Hall. The flag, an infinity symbol on a field of blue, will join the civic, provincial and national flags at City Hall, facing Main Street. Flying the Nation’s flag also acknowledges the critical role the Métis played in the building of the Red River Settlement, now called Winnipeg, and bringing the province of Manitoba into confederation. Until now, these requests have not been heard or honoured.

Manitoba is the only province brought into Canada’s confederation by an Indigenous government. You can’t meaningfully discuss the history of Manitoba without involving the Métis Nation.”

First unfurled in 1816, and widely recognized as the standard for Métis Nation at the Victory of Frog Plain, the Métis flag predates the flag of Canada by approximately 150 years. It is the oldest patriotic flag that is indigenous to Canada. It was accepted by the Métis National Council as the official flag of the Métis Nation and was secured in 2013 through an official mark, to protect it as a symbol of the Métis Nation, and ensure its collective ownership by the Citizens of the Métis Nation.


December 21, 2020


Métis

The Path to Reconciliation Annual Report, 2020

The first sections highlight new efforts the Manitoba government undertook between April 1, 2019 and March 31, 2020, while the later sections identify the previously reported and ongoing activities.

Manitoba took dozens of new actions between April 1, 2019, and March 31, 2020, to address the legacy of the impact from residential schools including creating a mental health and addictions strategy, with the mental health of Indigenous peoples being one of the top seven priority areas in the Virgo report.
Over the last two years, the number of children in care has declined, which is a positive trend for children and families, particularly Indigenous children and families. The province anticipates the ongoing work toward transforming the child welfare system will support a continuation of this positive trend, the minister added.

The government of Manitoba has also taken action to address dozens of the Calls to Action including:

  • invested over $110,000 to train public servants on the history of Indigenous peoples including developing a professional workshop ‘The Path to Reconciliation: A Historic and Contemporary Overview’;
  • partnered with the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba, the Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre and the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs to create a five-year Treaty Education Initiative in the fall of 2019 that works with teachers to ensure students between kindergarten and Grade 12 learn about the treaties and treaty relationships; and
  • established an economic development office, with Indigenous engagement as a mandated priority and key focus to foster Indigenous contributions to Manitoba’s economy.

https://www.gov.mb.ca/inr/reports-and-expenses/pubs/ptr-act-annual-progress-report-2019-2020.pdf


December 1, 2020


First Nations

The Path to Reconciliation Annual Report, 2020

The section on Legacies outlines the Manitoba government’s efforts to address the disparities existing between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Manitoba’s social, political and economic systems and institutions. We have collaborated with many different service providers and organizations to address gaps in the areas of child welfare, education, language and culture, and health and justice.

The section on Reconciliation highlights our ongoing work to establish and maintain mutually respectful relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, and to create a more equitable and inclusive society. The Manitoba government, in partnership with many other organizations, have taken action towards reconciliation under many of the themes outlined in the TRC’s Calls to Action.
https://www.gov.mb.ca/inr/reports-and-expenses/pubs/ptr-act-annual-progress-report-2019-2020.pdf


November 19, 2019


First Nations

Speech from the Throne

Limited reference to Indigenous issues and/or priorities other than three specific references to restorative justice programs for youth offenders, formalize new resource development agreements and develop new opportunities for northern tourism and move forward with the principles of shared management with First Nations and Métis people in order to ensure sustainable wildlife and fish populations.


September, 2019


First Nations

The Path to Reconciliation Annual Report, 2019

The first sections highlight new efforts the Manitoba government undertook between April 1, 2018 and March 31, 2019, while the later sections identify the previously reported and ongoing activities. Each year, the Manitoba government implements and supports a number of initiatives that further reconciliation outside of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action. This report includes highlights of these activities.

The section on Legacies outlines the Manitoba government’s efforts to address the disparities existing between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Manitoba’s social, political and economic systems and institutions. We have collaborated with many different service providers and organizations to address gaps in the areas of child welfare, education, language and culture, and health and justice.

The section on Reconciliation highlights our ongoing work to establish and maintain mutually respectful relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, and to create a more equitable and inclusive society. The Manitoba government, in partnership with many other organizations, have taken action towards reconciliation under many of the themes outlined in the TRC’s calls to action.
https://www.gov.mb.ca/inr/reports-and-expenses/pubs/ptr-act-annual-progress-report-2018-2019-english.pdf


September 1, 2019


Métis

The Path to Reconciliation Annual Report, 2019

The first sections highlight new efforts the Manitoba government undertook between April 1, 2018 and March 31, 2019, while the later sections identify the previously reported and ongoing activities. Each year, the Manitoba government implements and supports a number of initiatives that further reconciliation outside of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action. This report includes highlights of these activities.
The section on Legacies outlines the Manitoba government’s efforts to address the disparities existing between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Manitoba’s social, political and economic systems and institutions. We have collaborated with many different service providers and organizations to address gaps in the areas of child welfare, education, language and culture, and health and justice.
The section on Reconciliation highlights our ongoing work to establish and maintain mutually respectful relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, and to create a more equitable and inclusive society. The Manitoba government, in partnership with many other organizations, have taken action towards reconciliation under many of the themes outlined in the TRC’s calls to action.
https://www.gov.mb.ca/inr/reports-and-expenses/pubs/ptr-act-annual-progress-report-2018-2019-english.pdf


September 24, 2018


Métis

Joint Action Plan on Advancing Reconciliation

The Manitoba Métis Federation (MMF) and the Government of Canada – have agreed to a three-part plan for moving forward together to advance reconciliation with the Manitoba Métis Community. In order to support this plan, Canada will provide $154.3 million to the MMF as the parties continue to work to advance reconciliation:
The Manitoba Metis Federation will use a portion of this funding to invest in areas it has identified to improve the social and economic well-being of the Manitoba Métis Community. This funding will form part of the reconciliation package that the parties are jointly working toward.

The parties will work towards reaching a self-government agreement in a timely manner that recognizes the Manitoba Metis Federation’s legal status, role and jurisdiction as a Métis government and implements the Manitoba Métis Community’s vision of greater self-determination.

The funding will support the Manitoba Metis Federation’s transition from its current corporate structure to a self-governing Métis government.
https://www.canada.ca/en/crown-indigenous-relations-northern-affairs/news/2018/09/manitoba-metis-federation-and-government-of-canada-announce-joint-action-plan-on-advancing-reconciliation.html


September, 2018


Métis

The Path to Reconciliation Annual Report, 2018

The Manitoba Government reports on its actions following the two broad categories of “Legacies” and “Reconciliation” used by the TRC. The section on Legacies outlines the Manitoba governments efforts to address the disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Manitoba’s social, political and economic systems and institutions. We have collaborated with many different service providers and organizations to address gaps in the areas of child welfare, education, language and culture and health and justice.
The section on Reconciliation highlights our ongoing work to establish and maintain mutually respectful relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples and to create a more equitable and inclusive society.
https://www.gov.mb.ca/inr/reports-and-expenses/pubs/ptr-act-annual-progress-report-2017-2018-english.pdf


August 20, 2018


First Nations

The Path to Reconciliation Annual Report, 2018

The Manitoba Government reports on its actions following the two broad categories of “Legacies” and “Reconciliation” used by the TRC. The section on Legacies outlines the Manitoba governments efforts to address the disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Manitoba’s social, political and economic systems and institutions. We have collaborated with many different service providers and organizations to address gaps in the areas of child welfare, education, language and culture and health and justice. The section on Reconciliation highlights our ongoing work to establish and maintain mutually respectful relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples and to create a more equitable and inclusive society.
https://www.gov.mb.ca/inr/reports-and-expenses/pubs/ptr-act-annual-progress-report-2017-2018-english.pdf


June 4, 2018


Métis

Lawsuit over Turning the Page Agreement, Nov. 26, 2014

MMF’s has authorized legal proceedings against the Pallister government for its breach of the honour of the Crown and the Kwaysh-kin-na-mihk la paazh Agreement (“Turning the Page Agreement”) signed between the MMF, Manitoba Hydro and the Manitoba Government in November 2014. “It is outrageous and embarrassing for a Manitoba Premier to act like this—to overreach and politically interfere with the management and operations of Manitoba Hydro in violation of laws and well-established policies. This is particularly so when these unilateral and sharp actions violate a legally binding agreement and attempt to force a Crown corporation to breach a legally binding agreement negotiated with an Indigenous people. We will hold the Premier to account for his actions,” said President Chartrand
http://www.mmf.mb.ca/docs/hydro_docs/MMF-Hydro-Manitoba-Turning-the-Page-Agreement.pdf


March 2, 2018


Métis

Mineral Development Protocol

The Manitoba Government stated it is working in partnership with First Nations to develop a provincial mineral development protocol to advance mineral development opportunities and projects on Indigenous territories but has excluded the Métis Nation of Manitoba from discussions. “The protocol, as is now being written, will mislead and confuse industry and increase instability, financial risk, and failure in mining developments in Manitoba.” (MMF)


August 17, 2017


First Nations

Indigenous and Municipal Affairs Re-org

Winnipeg Sun – The previous post for Indigenous and Municipal Relations will now split into two departments, led by a Municipal Relations Minister and an Indigenous and Northern Relations Minister.


June 1, 2017


Métis

The Path to Reconciliation Annual Report, 2017

This report is composed of three sections; Addressing Legacies, Reconciling for the Future and Looking Forward. Engagement with Indigenous nations and Indigenous peoples is integrated into our efforts towards a reconciled province and especially highlighted in the section, Reconciling for our Future – Reconciling Relationships.

Addressing Legacies

  • Caring for Children and Families
  • Improving Health Outcomes
  • Supporting Restorative Justice; offenders, victims and families
  • Supporting First Nation, Métis and Inuit Students and their Families in Education
  • Delivering Training and Employment Opportunities

Reconciling for the Future

  • Reconciling for Children and their Families
  • Reclamation of Indigenous identity through Language, Culture and Heritage
  • Education and Training for ReconciliationReconciling Relationships
  • Recognition and Reconciliation of Aboriginal and Treaty Rights
  • Land Based Initiatives

https://digitalcollection.gov.mb.ca/awweb/pdfopener?smd=1&did=26548&md=1


June 1, 2017


First Nations

The Path to Reconciliation Annual Report, 2017

This report is composed of three sections; Addressing Legacies, Reconciling for the Future and Looking Forward. Engagement with Indigenous nations and Indigenous peoples is integrated into our efforts towards a reconciled province and especially highlighted in the section, Reconciling for our Future – Reconciling Relationships.

  • Addressing Legacies
  • Caring for Children and Families
  • Improving Health Outcomes
  • Supporting Restorative Justice; offenders, victims and families
  • Supporting First Nation, Métis and Inuit Students and their Families in Education
  • Delivering Training and Employment Opportunities
  • Reconciling for the Future
  • Reconciling for Children and their Families
  • Reclamation of Indigenous identity through Language, Culture and Heritage
  • Education and Training for Reconciliation
  • Reconciling Relationships
  • Recognition and Reconciliation of Aboriginal and Treaty Rights
  • Land Based Initiatives

https://digitalcollection.gov.mb.ca/awweb/pdfopener?smd=1&did=26548&md=1


November 15, 2016


Métis

Framework for Advancing Reconciliation

Jointly developed Framework Agreement sets out a process to begin formal reconciliation negotiations to address the outstanding issues raised in the 2013 Manitoba Métis Federation Inc. v. Canada decision of the Supreme Court of Canada that will lead to a modern-day treaty with Canada. “This is a monumental and historic time for Manitoba’s Métis. After more than 140 years, three decades of court battles and numerous consultations with our Métis Citizens, I am honoured and humbled to present to Louis Riel – at a gravesite ceremony celebrating the 131st anniversary of the judicial murder of Métis Visionary and Leader – and the Manitoba Métis, this signed Framework Agreement that will start the formal negotiations leading to the reconciliation of our constitutional grievance and the renewal of the solemn promise,” said President Chartrand.
https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1502395273330/1539711712698


June 1, 2016


First Nations

The Path to Reconciliation Annual Report, 2016

Objectives:

Manitoba Families;

  • the new government has introduced “The Protecting Children Act‘ to make it easier for government departments, child and family service authorities, community service providers and law enforcement agencies to share information and collaborate when dealing with victimized and at-risk children.
  • the government will foster innovative community and private sector partnerships that promote practical home ownership opportunities for First Nations families such as the partnership between the Manitoba Real Estate Association and the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs.
  • the government will work to build the flood protection necessary to keep Manitobans and their communities safe, beginning with the outlet needed to alleviate flooding around Lake Manitoba.

Manitoba Indigenous and Municipal Relations:

  • the government will establish a duty to consult framework for respectful and productive consultations with Indigenous communities.
  • the government will build respectful and effective partnerships involving all levels of government to responsibly and sustainably develop our natural resources.
  • the government will work with the federal government on enhanced education funding for students on reserve.
  • the new government will work positively and respectfully with northern Manitobans and communities.

Manitoba Indigenous and Municipal Relations and Manitoba Growth Enterprise and Trade

  • the government will support Urban Aboriginal Economic Development Zones in partnership with First Nations to create jobs and economic opportunities together.

Manitoba Indigenous and Municipal Relations, Manitoba Sustainable Development, and Manitoba Growth, Enterprise and Trade

  • the government will work positively and respectfully with northern Manitobans and communities, to create a special, targeted program for northern Manitoba called Yes! North.
  • the government will develop partnerships needed to attract new companies, assist entrepreneurs, and facilitate expansion of existing businesses to provide quality jobs and a stronger economy in the north, focused on
    • sustainable development of natural resources, including forestry and mining and
    • tourism opportunities, including beluga whale watching, polar bear and aurora borealis tours, fishing and hunting.

Manitoba Sustainable Development

  • the new government will develop comprehensive harvest co-management strategies in consultation with First Nations, Metis and licensed hunters and anglers to give local communities a greater voice and ensure long-term sustainability of our wildlife populations.
  • the government will develop a framework to reconcile the needs of industry and rural and northern communities, while continuing to enhance the network of protected areas in Manitoba’s natural regions.

https://digitalcollection.gov.mb.ca/awweb/pdfopener?smd=1&did=25372&md=1


June 1, 2016


Métis

The Path to Reconciliation Annual Report, 2016

The government will carry out work in 2016/17 that will lead to the development of an initial engagement strategy to seek feedback on a reconciliation strategy from Indigenous leaders. This initial engagement will be followed by a more fulsome engagement process that will take place at a later date, once initial discussions have occurred. while the strategy is being developed, the government has made a firm commitment to work positively and respectfully with Indigenous people and communities toward the following objectives through:

Manitoba Families:

  • the new government has introduced The Protecting Children Act to make it easier for government departments, child and family service authorities, community service providers and law enforcement agencies to share information and collaborate when dealing with victimized and at-risk children.
  • the government will foster innovative community and private sector partnerships that promote practical home ownership opportunities for First Nations families such as the partnership between the Manitoba Real Estate Association and the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs.

Manitoba Infrastructure and Manitoba Indigenous and Municipal Relations:

  • the government will work to build the flood protection necessary to keep Manitobans and their communities safe, beginning with the outlet needed to alleviate flooding around Lake Manitoba.

Manitoba Indigenous and Municipal Relations:

  • the government will establish a duty to consult framework for respectful and productive consultations with Indigenous communities.
  • the government will build respectful and effective partnerships involving all levels of government to responsibly and sustainably develop our natural resources.
  • the government will work with the federal government on enhanced education funding for students on reserve.
  • the new government will work positively and respectfully with northern Manitobans and communities.

Manitoba Indigenous and Municipal Relations and Manitoba Growth Enterprise and Trade

  • the government will support Urban Aboriginal Economic Development Zones in partnership with First Nations to create jobs and economic opportunities together.

Manitoba Indigenous and Municipal Relations, Manitoba Sustainable Development, and Manitoba Growth, Enterprise and Trade

  • the government will work positively and respectfully with northern Manitobans and communities, to create a special, targeted program for northern Manitoba called Yes! North.
  • the government will develop partnerships needed to attract new companies, assist entrepreneurs, and facilitate expansion of existing businesses to provide quality jobs and a stronger economy in the north, focused on
    • sustainable development of natural resources, including forestry and mining and
    • tourism opportunities, including beluga whale watching, polar bear and aurora borealis tours, fishing and hunting.

Manitoba Sustainable Development

  • the new government will develop comprehensive harvest co-management strategies in consultation with First Nations, Metis and licensed hunters and anglers to give local communities a greater voice and ensure longterm sustainability of our wildlife populations.
  • the government will develop a framework to reconcile the needs of industry and rural and northern communities, while continuing to enhance the network of protected areas in Manitoba’s natural regions.

https://digitalcollection.gov.mb.ca/awweb/pdfopener?smd=1&did=25372&md=1


May 27, 2016


Métis

MOU on Advancing Reconciliation

Sets out a mutually agreeable path forward on finding a shared solution on implementing the Manitoba Métis Federation (MMF) Decision (2013 Manitoba Metis Federation et al. v. Canada decision of the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC). The SCC decision is about undue delay in providing the land grants promised to the Métis in s. 31 of the Manitoba Act, 1870. That delay was found to be inconsistent with the honour of the Crown. As a first step, the parties will work together to develop a framework agreement that sets out a process for negotiating a shared solution in the future. The goal is to develop this mutually acceptable framework agreement over the coming months.
https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1467055681745/1539711559006


March 15, 2016


Métis

Path to Reconciliation Act

Passed unanimously is committed to reconciliation and will be “guided by the calls to action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the principles set out in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.” Government commits to annual updates 3 months after the fiscal year end. This Bill sets out the government’s commitment to advancing reconciliation, led by the minister responsible for reconciliation. A strategic path forward is to be developed, and the measures taken to advance reconciliation are to be annually reported.
https://web2.gov.mb.ca/bills/40-5/b018e.php


March 15, 2016


First Nations

Path to Reconciliation Act

The Path to Reconciliation” passed unanimously is committed to reconciliation and will be “guided by the calls to action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the principles set out in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.” Government commits to annual updates 3 months after the fiscal year end. This Bill sets out the government’s commitment to advancing reconciliation, led by the minister responsible for reconciliation. A strategic path forward is to be developed, and the measures taken to advance reconciliation are to be annually reported.
https://web2.gov.mb.ca/bills/40-5/b018e.php


June 3, 2015


Métis

Response to TRC Summary Report

Already acting upon three TRC Calls to Action: (CBC)

  • Recognize aboriginal healing practices and use them to treat aboriginal patients
  • Recruit aboriginal healthcare providers in aboriginal communities and across the healthcare field
  • Consult with residential school survivors and aboriginal people to make curriculum about residential schools and other aboriginal history

June 3, 2015


First Nations

Response to TRC Summary Report

CBC – Already acting upon three TRC Calls to Action:

  • Recognize aboriginal healing practices and use them to treat aboriginal patients
  • Recruit aboriginal healthcare providers in aboriginal communities and across the healthcare field
  • Consult with residential school survivors and aboriginal people to make curriculum about residential schools and other aboriginal history

March 8, 2013


Métis

Manitoba Métis Land Claim

The Manitoba Métis Land Claim slowly made its way through the Queen’s Bench, the Court of Appeal and finally to the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC). In March 2013 the SCC acknowledged the Manitoba Métis Federation as the body that represents the Manitoba Métis in this collective claim against the Crown. In its decision this Court also accepted the MMF as the self-government of Manitoba’s Métis Community. In its 2013 decision the SCC ruled the constitutional promise made in the Manitoba Act, 1870 was not kept by Canada.
https://www.canadashistory.ca/explore/politics-law/supreme-court-makes-historic-ruling-on-metis-land-claim


June 12, 2008


First Nations

Offical Apology

Formal apology to the Indigenous community for the legacy of the Residential School system.